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Article

Handedness Does Not Impact Inhibitory Control, but Movement Execution and Reactive Inhibition Are More under a Left-Hemisphere Control

1
Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Viale Europa 11, 25123 Brescia, BS, Italy
2
IRCCS Neuromed, Via Atinense 18, 86077 Pozzilli, IS, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sebastian Ocklenburg
Symmetry 2021, 13(9), 1602; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13091602
Received: 22 June 2021 / Revised: 3 August 2021 / Accepted: 12 August 2021 / Published: 1 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Left-Right Asymmetry in Cell Biology)
The relationship between handedness, laterality, and inhibitory control is a valuable benchmark for testing the hypothesis of the right-hemispheric specialization of inhibition. According to this theory, and given that to stop a limb movement, it is sufficient to alter the activity of the contralateral hemisphere, then suppressing a left arm movement should be faster than suppressing a right-arm movement. This is because, in the latter case, inhibitory commands produced in the right hemisphere should be sent to the other hemisphere. Further, as lateralization of cognitive functions in left-handers is less pronounced than in right-handers, in the former, the inhibitory control should rely on both hemispheres. We tested these predictions on a medium-large sample of left- and right-handers (n = 52). Each participant completed two sessions of the reaching versions of the stop-signal task, one using the right arm and one using the left arm. We found that reactive and proactive inhibition do not differ according to handedness. However, we found a significant advantage of the right versus the left arm in canceling movements outright. By contrast, there were no differences in proactive inhibition. As we also found that participants performed movements faster with the right than with the left arm, we interpret our results in light of the dominant role of the left hemisphere in some aspects of motor control. View Full-Text
Keywords: handedness; laterality; reactive inhibitory control; proactive inhibitory control; stop-signal task; reaching arm movements handedness; laterality; reactive inhibitory control; proactive inhibitory control; stop-signal task; reaching arm movements
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mancini, C.; Mirabella, G. Handedness Does Not Impact Inhibitory Control, but Movement Execution and Reactive Inhibition Are More under a Left-Hemisphere Control. Symmetry 2021, 13, 1602. https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13091602

AMA Style

Mancini C, Mirabella G. Handedness Does Not Impact Inhibitory Control, but Movement Execution and Reactive Inhibition Are More under a Left-Hemisphere Control. Symmetry. 2021; 13(9):1602. https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13091602

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mancini, Christian, and Giovanni Mirabella. 2021. "Handedness Does Not Impact Inhibitory Control, but Movement Execution and Reactive Inhibition Are More under a Left-Hemisphere Control" Symmetry 13, no. 9: 1602. https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13091602

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