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Open AccessArticle

Assessing Food Systems and Their Impact on Common Pool Resources and Resilience

1
Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Mittelstrasse 43, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
2
Institute of Social Anthropology, University of Bern, Lerchenweg 36, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
3
Institute of Geography & Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Mittelstrasse 43, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 March 2019 / Revised: 16 April 2019 / Accepted: 18 April 2019 / Published: 23 April 2019
The ongoing expansion of agro-industrial food systems is associated with severe socio-ecological problems. For a closer look at the socio-ecological impacts, we analyze the capacity of six food systems to provide farm-based agroecosystem services with the Agroecosystem Service Capacity (ASC) approach. At the same time, we analyze how food systems affect the management of common pool resources (CPR). Our findings show that indigenous peoples and agroecological food systems can have up to three times the ASC-index of agro-industrial food systems. Through their contribution to the sustainable management of cultural landscapes with robust institutions for the management of CPRs, food systems contribute to socio-ecological integrity. On the other hand, regional and agro-industrial food systems with a lower ASC-index contribute less to socio-ecological integrity, and they undermine and open up common property institutions for robust CPR management. As a result, they appropriate (or grab) access to CPRs that are vital for food systems with higher ASC-indexes resulting from a robust management of CPRs. Strengthening a robust management of CPRs could put a halt to the ongoing expansion of food systems with a low ASC-index by replacing them with a high ASC-index to prevent an exacerbation of the current socio-ecological situation. View Full-Text
Keywords: common pool resources; food systems; agroecosystems and agroecosystem service common pool resources; food systems; agroecosystems and agroecosystem service
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MDPI and ACS Style

Augstburger, H.; Käser, F.; Rist, S. Assessing Food Systems and Their Impact on Common Pool Resources and Resilience. Land 2019, 8, 71.

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