Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Understanding the Ecological Response of Planktic and Benthic Epipelic Algae to Environmental Factors in an Urban Rivers System
Previous Article in Journal
Tap Water, Bottled Water or In-Home Water Treatment Systems: Insights on Household Perceptions and Choices
Previous Article in Special Issue
Seasonal Differences in Taxonomic Diversity of Rotifer Communities in a Hungarian Lowland Oxbow Lake Exposed to Aquaculture Effluent
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Effect of Temperature on the Size of Sedimentary Remains of Littoral Chydorids

1
Department of Water Supply and Sewerage, Faculty of Water Science, University of Public Service, Bajcsy-Zs. utca 12-14, 6500 Baja, Hungary
2
Department of Environmental Sciences, Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania, Calea Turzii nr. 4, 400193 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
3
MTA—PE Limnoecology Research Group, University of Pannonia, Warta Vince u. 1, 8200 Veszprém, Hungary
4
Food and Wine Research Center, Eszterházy Károly University, Leányka u. 6, H-3300 Eger, Hungary
5
Department of Animal Ecology & Systematics, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26-32 IFZ, D-35392 Giessen, Germany
6
Department of Hydrobiology, University of Debrecen, Egyetem tér 1, H-4032 Debrecen, Hungary
7
Department of Zoology, Hungarian Natural History Museum, Baross u. 13, 1088 Budapest, Hungary
8
Public Institution Nature Park ‘Vransko Jezero’, Kralja P. Svacica 2, 23210 Biograd na Moru, Croatia
9
The Lake Vesijärvi Foundation, Askonkatu 9 C, 15100 Lahti, Finland
10
Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Niemenkatu 73, FI-15140 Lahti, Finland
11
Department of Geosciences and Geography, University ofHelsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
12
Department of Environmental and Landscape Geography, Eötvös Lorand University, Pázmány Péter stny. 1/C, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary
13
MTA-MTM-ELTE Research Group for Paleontology, Pázmány Péter stny. 1/C, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary
14
Centre for Ecological Research, GINOP Sustainable Ecosystems Group, Klebelsberg Kuno 3, H-8237 Tihany, Hungary
15
Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65 (Viikinkaari 1), FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
16
Department of Botany, Hungarian Natural History Museum, Baross u. 13, 1088 Budapest, Hungary
17
MTA Centre for Ecological Research, Danube Research Institute, Karolina út 29, H-1113 Budapest, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(5), 1309; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051309
Received: 28 March 2020 / Revised: 26 April 2020 / Accepted: 30 April 2020 / Published: 6 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Response of the Plankton Community to Environmental Stress)
The body size of aquatic invertebrates is, to a great extent, dependent on ambient temperature, but size distributions are also determined by other factors like food supply and predation. The effect of temperature on organisms is formulated in the temperature–size hypothesis, which predicts a smaller body size with increasing temperature. In this study, the effect of temperature on the subfossil remains of three littoral Cladocera (Alona affnis, A. quadrangularis, and Chydorus cf. sphaericus) was investigated. Exoskeletal remains of these species can be found in large numbers in lacustrine sediments and over a wide north–south range in Europe. The total length of both headshield and postabdomen for A. affinis and A. quadrangularis and carapace length for C. cf. sphaericus were measured to observe their response to changes in latitude and temperature. A different response to ambient temperature in the growth of body parts was observed. The size of the headshields of both Alona species and of the carapace of Chydorus was significantly larger in colder regions as opposed to warm ones. It turned out that the postabdomen was not a good predictor of ambient temperature. While the sizes of all remains increased with latitude, the sizes of the Alona remains was smaller in the mountain lakes of the Southern Carpathians than in other cold lakes, in this case in Finland, a fact indicative of the importance of other factors on size distribution. This study demonstrates that a morphological response to climate is present in littoral cladocerans, and, therefore, changes in the length of headshield and carapace may be used as a proxy for climate changes in paleolimnological records. View Full-Text
Keywords: subfossil remains; size distribution; latitudinal pattern; temperature effect; benthic chydoridae; cladocera subfossil remains; size distribution; latitudinal pattern; temperature effect; benthic chydoridae; cladocera
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Korponai, J.L.; Kövér, C.; López-Blanco, C.; Gyulai, I.; Forró, L.; Katalinic, A.; Ketola, M.; Nevalainen, L.; Luoto, T.P.; Sarmaja-Korjonen, K.; Magyari, E.K.; Weckström, J.; Urák, I.; Vadkerti, E.; Buczkó, K. Effect of Temperature on the Size of Sedimentary Remains of Littoral Chydorids. Water 2020, 12, 1309.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop