Atmosphere 2013, 4(3), 237-253; doi:10.3390/atmos4030237
Article

Extension Agrometeorology as the Answer to Stakeholder Realities: Response Farming and the Consequences of Climate Change

1 Agromet Vision-Netherlands, Indonesia, Ghana, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Groenestraat 13, Bruchem 5314 AJ, The Netherlands 2 Department of Soil, Crop and Climate Sciences, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9301, South Africa 3 Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Social & Political Sciences, Universitas Indonesia, Fl.6/Building H.-Selo Soemardjan Room, Kampus UI, Depok 16424, Indonesia 4 Department of Agricultural Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi 03220, Ghana 5 Institute for Soil, Climate and Water, Agricultural Research Council, Private Bag x 79, Glen 9360, South Africa 6 Zambia Meteorological Department, P.O. Box 60004, Livingstone 10101, Zambia
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 June 2013; Accepted: 13 August 2013 / Published: 20 August 2013
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Abstract: Extension agrometeorology is applied in agrometeorological extension work to advice and serve farmers. In agrometeorology, response farming has been developed decades ago. Climate change complicates response farming, but does not alter it. This paper reports on new operationalization of that response farming in new educational commitments in agroclimatology. It is explained how “Science Field Shops” are an example in Indonesia. This was based on a thorough analysis of what climate change means for farmers in Asia. For Africa, we report on eying the training of agrometeorological extension trainers (“product intermediaries”) in West Africa, based on a thorough analysis of what climate change means for farmers in Africa. We also compare experience with reaching farmers in South Africa and farmer communities in Zambia, as new forms of supporting response farming, all under conditions of a changing climate. The paper, for the first time, connects results from four different programs the senior author is taking part in. There is first and foremost the need for training material to make it possible for the product intermediaries to participate in training extension intermediaries. This should, particularly, bring new knowledge to farmers. With what is presently available and with new approaches, climate extension should be developed and tested with farmers in ways that improve farmer preparedness and decision making.
Keywords: changing climate; response farming; extension agrometeorology; Indonesia; Ghana; South Africa; Zambia

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MDPI and ACS Style

Stigter, K.; Winarto, Y.T.; Ofori, E.; Zuma-Netshiukhwi, G.; Nanja, D.; Walker, S. Extension Agrometeorology as the Answer to Stakeholder Realities: Response Farming and the Consequences of Climate Change. Atmosphere 2013, 4, 237-253.

AMA Style

Stigter K, Winarto YT, Ofori E, Zuma-Netshiukhwi G, Nanja D, Walker S. Extension Agrometeorology as the Answer to Stakeholder Realities: Response Farming and the Consequences of Climate Change. Atmosphere. 2013; 4(3):237-253.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stigter, Kees; Winarto, Yunita T.; Ofori, Emmanuel; Zuma-Netshiukhwi, Gugulethu; Nanja, Durton; Walker, Sue. 2013. "Extension Agrometeorology as the Answer to Stakeholder Realities: Response Farming and the Consequences of Climate Change." Atmosphere 4, no. 3: 237-253.

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