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Article

Interaction of a Low-Pressure System, an Offshore Trough, and Mid-Tropospheric Dry Air Intrusion: The Kerala Flood of August 2018

1
Department of Environmental Engineering, Texas A&M University, Kingsville, TX 78363, USA
2
Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(7), 740; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11070740
Received: 28 May 2020 / Revised: 29 June 2020 / Accepted: 9 July 2020 / Published: 13 July 2020
The present study examines the Kerala Flood Event (KFE, 15–16 August 2018, in India) that occurred along the west coast of India and resulted in ~400 mm of rainfall in one day. The KFE was unique in comparison to previous floods in India, not only due to the rainfall duration and amount, but also due to the fact that the dams failed to mitigate the flood, which made it the worst in history. The main goal of this study is to analyze and elucidate the KFE based on meteorological and hydrological parameters. A propagating low-pressure system (LPS) from the Bay of Bengal (BoB) caused the streak of plenty of rainfall over Kerala, the west coast, central India, and the BoB. Additionally, the upper-tropospheric anti-cyclonic system over the Middle East region inhibited a northward advancement of LPS. On the western coast of India, a non-propagating (with diurnal fluctuations) offshore trough was observed over the west coast (from Kerala to Gujarat state). Therefore, a synergic interaction between LPS, an intrusion of dry air in the middle-troposphere, and the offshore trough was the main reason for KFE. However, after around ten days, rainfall saturated the dam capacities; thus, the released water, along with the amount of precipitation on the day of the event, was one of the other possible reasons which worsened the flood over Kerala. View Full-Text
Keywords: Kerala Flood Event; off-shore trough; low-pressure systems Kerala Flood Event; off-shore trough; low-pressure systems
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kumar, V.; Pradhan, P.K.; Sinha, T.; Rao, S.V.B.; Chang, H.-P. Interaction of a Low-Pressure System, an Offshore Trough, and Mid-Tropospheric Dry Air Intrusion: The Kerala Flood of August 2018. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 740. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11070740

AMA Style

Kumar V, Pradhan PK, Sinha T, Rao SVB, Chang H-P. Interaction of a Low-Pressure System, an Offshore Trough, and Mid-Tropospheric Dry Air Intrusion: The Kerala Flood of August 2018. Atmosphere. 2020; 11(7):740. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11070740

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kumar, Vinay; Pradhan, Prabodha K.; Sinha, Tushar; Rao, S. V.B.; Chang, Hao-Po. 2020. "Interaction of a Low-Pressure System, an Offshore Trough, and Mid-Tropospheric Dry Air Intrusion: The Kerala Flood of August 2018" Atmosphere 11, no. 7: 740. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11070740

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