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Correction published on 16 March 2022, see Genes 2022, 13(3), 523.
Article

Methylphosphonate Degradation and Salt-Tolerance Genes of Two Novel Halophilic Marivita Metagenome-Assembled Genomes from Unrestored Solar Salterns

1
Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
2
Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, CA 92626, USA
3
Environmental Genomics and Systems Biology Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Nina Gunde-Cimerman
Genes 2022, 13(1), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13010148
Received: 22 December 2021 / Revised: 10 January 2022 / Accepted: 11 January 2022 / Published: 15 January 2022 / Corrected: 16 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Microbial Genetics and Genomics)
Aerobic bacteria that degrade methylphosphonates and produce methane as a byproduct have emerged as key players in marine carbon and phosphorus cycles. Here, we present two new draft genome sequences of the genus Marivita that were assembled from metagenomes from hypersaline former industrial salterns and compare them to five other Marivita reference genomes. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that both of these metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) represent new species in the genus. Average nucleotide identities to the closest taxon were <85%. The MAGs were assembled with SPAdes, binned with MetaBAT, and curated with scaffold extension and reassembly. Both genomes contained the phnCDEGHIJLMP suite of genes encoding the full C-P lyase pathway of methylphosphonate degradation and were significantly more abundant in two former industrial salterns than in nearby reference and restored wetlands, which have lower salinity levels and lower methane emissions than the salterns. These organisms contain a variety of compatible solute biosynthesis and transporter genes to cope with high salinity levels but harbor only slightly acidic proteomes (mean isoelectric point of 6.48). View Full-Text
Keywords: methanogenesis; methylphosphonate; salt tolerance; marine bacteria; phylogenomics; hypersaline methanogenesis; methylphosphonate; salt tolerance; marine bacteria; phylogenomics; hypersaline
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bueno de Mesquita, C.P.; Zhou, J.; Theroux, S.; Tringe, S.G. Methylphosphonate Degradation and Salt-Tolerance Genes of Two Novel Halophilic Marivita Metagenome-Assembled Genomes from Unrestored Solar Salterns. Genes 2022, 13, 148. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13010148

AMA Style

Bueno de Mesquita CP, Zhou J, Theroux S, Tringe SG. Methylphosphonate Degradation and Salt-Tolerance Genes of Two Novel Halophilic Marivita Metagenome-Assembled Genomes from Unrestored Solar Salterns. Genes. 2022; 13(1):148. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13010148

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bueno de Mesquita, Clifton P., Jinglie Zhou, Susanna Theroux, and Susannah G. Tringe. 2022. "Methylphosphonate Degradation and Salt-Tolerance Genes of Two Novel Halophilic Marivita Metagenome-Assembled Genomes from Unrestored Solar Salterns" Genes 13, no. 1: 148. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13010148

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