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Open AccessArticle

Uridine Prevents Negative Effects of OXPHOS Xenobiotics on Dopaminergic Neuronal Differentiation

1
Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Miguel Servet 177, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
2
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (IIS) de Aragón, Av. San Juan Bosco 13, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
3
Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Av. Monforte de Lemos 3-5, 28029 Madrid, Spain
4
Fundación ARAID. Av. de Ranillas 1-D, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2019, 8(11), 1407; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8111407
Received: 18 September 2019 / Revised: 5 November 2019 / Accepted: 6 November 2019 / Published: 8 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Organelle Function)
Neuronal differentiation appears to be dependent on oxidative phosphorylation capacity. Several drugs inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and might be detrimental for neuronal differentiation. Some pregnant women take these medications during their first weeks of gestation when fetal nervous system is being developed. These treatments might have later negative consequences on the offspring’s health. To analyze a potential negative effect of three widely used medications, we studied in vitro dopaminergic neuronal differentiation of cells exposed to pharmacologic concentrations of azidothymidine for acquired immune deficiency syndrome; linezolid for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis; and atovaquone for malaria. We also analyzed the dopaminergic neuronal differentiation in brains of fetuses from pregnant mice exposed to linezolid. The drugs reduced the in vitro oxidative phosphorylation capacity and dopaminergic neuronal differentiation. This differentiation process does not appear to be affected in the prenatally exposed fetus brain. Nevertheless, the global DNA methylation in fetal brain was significantly altered, perhaps linking an early exposure to a negative effect in older life. Uridine was able to prevent the negative effects on in vitro dopaminergic neuronal differentiation and on in vivo global DNA methylation. Uridine could be used as a protective agent against oxidative phosphorylation-inhibiting pharmaceuticals provided during pregnancy when dopaminergic neuronal differentiation is taking place. View Full-Text
Keywords: oxidative phosphorylation; xenobiotics; linezolid; uridine; neuronal differentiation; Parkinson’s disease oxidative phosphorylation; xenobiotics; linezolid; uridine; neuronal differentiation; Parkinson’s disease
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Iglesias, E.; Bayona-Bafaluy, M.P.; Pesini, A.; Garrido-Pérez, N.; Meade, P.; Gaudó, P.; Jiménez-Salvador, I.; Montoya, J.; Ruiz-Pesini, E. Uridine Prevents Negative Effects of OXPHOS Xenobiotics on Dopaminergic Neuronal Differentiation. Cells 2019, 8, 1407.

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