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Adenosine Receptor Antagonists to Combat Cancer and to Boost Anti-Cancer Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy

1
CiberNed, Network Research Center, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Spanish National Health Institute Carlos III, 28034 Madrid, Spain
2
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biomedicine, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
3
Department of Biochemistry and Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Science, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current Address: RG Neuroplasticity, Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, 39118 Magdeburg, Germany.
Academic Editor: Anthony Ashton
Cells 2021, 10(11), 2831; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10112831
Received: 9 September 2021 / Revised: 15 October 2021 / Accepted: 16 October 2021 / Published: 21 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue G-Protein Coupled Receptors in Cancer)
Extracellular adenosine accumulates in the environment of numerous tumors. For years, this fact has fueled preclinical research to determine whether adenosine receptors (ARs) could be the target to fight cancer. The four ARs discovered so far, A1, A2A, A2B and A3, belong to the class A family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and all four have been involved in one way or another in regulating tumor progression. Prompted by the successful anti-cancer immunotherapy, the focus was placed on the ARs more involved in regulation of immune cell differentiation and activation and that are able to establish molecular and functional interactions. This review focuses on the potential of A2A and A2B receptor antagonists in cancer control and in boosting anti-cancer chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The article also overviews the ongoing clinical trials in which A2AR and A2BR ligands are being tested in anti-cancer therapy. View Full-Text
Keywords: A2A adenosine receptor; A2B adenosine receptor; clinical trial; carcinoma; metastases; chemoradiation; glioma; neuroblastoma A2A adenosine receptor; A2B adenosine receptor; clinical trial; carcinoma; metastases; chemoradiation; glioma; neuroblastoma
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MDPI and ACS Style

Franco, R.; Rivas-Santisteban, R.; Navarro, G.; Reyes-Resina, I. Adenosine Receptor Antagonists to Combat Cancer and to Boost Anti-Cancer Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy. Cells 2021, 10, 2831. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10112831

AMA Style

Franco R, Rivas-Santisteban R, Navarro G, Reyes-Resina I. Adenosine Receptor Antagonists to Combat Cancer and to Boost Anti-Cancer Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy. Cells. 2021; 10(11):2831. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10112831

Chicago/Turabian Style

Franco, Rafael, Rafael Rivas-Santisteban, Gemma Navarro, and Irene Reyes-Resina. 2021. "Adenosine Receptor Antagonists to Combat Cancer and to Boost Anti-Cancer Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy" Cells 10, no. 11: 2831. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10112831

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