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Detection and Quantification of Fusarium spp. (F. oxysporum, F. verticillioides, F. graminearum) and Magnaporthiopsis maydis in Maize Using Real-Time PCR Targeting the ITS Region
Open AccessArticle

Methods for Studying Magnaporthiopsis maydis, the Maize Late Wilt Causal Agent

1
Faculty of Sciences, Tel-Hai College, Upper Galilee, Tel-Hai 12210, Israel
2
Department of Plant Sciences, Migal—Galilee Research Institute, Tarshish 2, Kiryat Shmona 11016, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(4), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9040181
Received: 23 February 2019 / Revised: 22 March 2019 / Accepted: 25 March 2019 / Published: 9 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Etiology and Control of Crop Diseases)
Late wilt, a destructive vascular disease of maize caused by the fungus Magnaporthiopsis maydis, is characterized by relatively fast wilting of maize plants closely before the physiological maturity stage. Previously, traditional microbiology-based methods have been used to isolate the pathogen and to characterize its traits. More recently, several molecular methods have been developed, enabling accurate and sensitive examination of the pathogen spread within the host. Here, we review the methods developed in the past 10 years in Israel, which include new or modified microbial and molecular techniques to identify, monitor, and study M. maydis in controlled environments and in the field. The assays inspected are exemplified with new findings and include microbial isolation methods, microscopic and PCR or qPCR identification, spore germination evaluation, root pathogenicity assay, M. maydis hyphae or filtrate effects on grain germination and sprout development, and a field assay. These diagnostic protocols enable rapid and reliable detection and identification of the pathogen in plants and seeds and studying the pathogenesis of M. maydis in susceptible and relatively resistant maize cultivars in a contaminated field. Moreover, these techniques are important for studying the population structure, and for future development of new strategies to restrict the disease’s outburst and spread. View Full-Text
Keywords: Acremonium maydis; black bundle disease; Cephalosporium maydis; diagnosis; fungus; Harpophora maydis; late wilt; Magnaporthiopsis maydis; methods; real-time PCR Acremonium maydis; black bundle disease; Cephalosporium maydis; diagnosis; fungus; Harpophora maydis; late wilt; Magnaporthiopsis maydis; methods; real-time PCR
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MDPI and ACS Style

Degani, O.; Dor, S.; Movshovitz, D.; Rabinovitz, O. Methods for Studying Magnaporthiopsis maydis, the Maize Late Wilt Causal Agent. Agronomy 2019, 9, 181.

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