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Frequency of Deoxynivalenol Concentrations above the Maximum Limit in Raw Winter Wheat Grain during a 12-Year Multi-Site Survey
Article

Low-Cost Spore Traps: An Efficient Tool to Manage Fusarium Head Blight through Improved Cropping Systems

1
Ecological Plant Protection in Arable Crops, Plant Protection, Agroscope, 8046 Zurich, Switzerland
2
Center for Organic Farming, University of Hohenheim, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Silvio Tundo, Carla Ceoloni and L. Kuzmanović
Agronomy 2021, 11(5), 987; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11050987
Received: 10 April 2021 / Revised: 10 May 2021 / Accepted: 13 May 2021 / Published: 15 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Disease Management and Mycotoxin Prevention in Cereals)
Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease of wheat. Worldwide, Fusarium graminearum is the most dominant FHB-causing species. Its most common toxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), impairs food and feed safety and has an enormous economic impact. Agronomic factors such as crop rotation, soil management and host genotype strongly influence the occurrence of F. graminearum. Infected plant debris from previous crops, on which perithecia and ascospores develop, represent the main source for FHB, and hence, improved cropping systems aim to reduce this inoculum to decrease the infection risk. The best measure to evaluate the disease pressure is spore traps that detect deposited airborne ascospores. Commercial spore traps are expensive and require power sources, thus, they are not suitable for investigations in field experiments with different treatments. In consequence, we developed spore traps containing a Petri dish with Fusarium-selective agar, protected by aluminum dishes and attached on a wooden board. We compared the data of our low-cost trap with those of a commercial high-throughput jet sampler and obtained equivalent results. In field experiments to compare cropping systems, we observed a high correlation between the DON content in wheat grains and the number of colonies from deposited spores. Our spore trap proved to be a highly valuable tool to not only study FHB epidemiology but also to identify innovative cropping systems with a lower risk for FHB and DON contamination. View Full-Text
Keywords: deoxynivalenol; food safety; forecast; Fusarium; integrated management; wheat deoxynivalenol; food safety; forecast; Fusarium; integrated management; wheat
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MDPI and ACS Style

Forrer, H.-R.; Pflugfelder, A.; Musa, T.; Vogelgsang, S. Low-Cost Spore Traps: An Efficient Tool to Manage Fusarium Head Blight through Improved Cropping Systems. Agronomy 2021, 11, 987. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11050987

AMA Style

Forrer H-R, Pflugfelder A, Musa T, Vogelgsang S. Low-Cost Spore Traps: An Efficient Tool to Manage Fusarium Head Blight through Improved Cropping Systems. Agronomy. 2021; 11(5):987. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11050987

Chicago/Turabian Style

Forrer, Hans-Rudolf, Annegret Pflugfelder, Tomke Musa, and Susanne Vogelgsang. 2021. "Low-Cost Spore Traps: An Efficient Tool to Manage Fusarium Head Blight through Improved Cropping Systems" Agronomy 11, no. 5: 987. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11050987

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