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Article

Factors Affecting the Establishment and Growth of Cover Crops Intersown into Maize (Zea mays L.)

Department of Plant Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58104, USA
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Academic Editor: Emanuele Radicetti
Agronomy 2021, 11(4), 712; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11040712
Received: 10 March 2021 / Revised: 25 March 2021 / Accepted: 5 April 2021 / Published: 8 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Farming Sustainability)
In the North Central USA, intersowing cover crops into standing maize (Zea mays L.) is required to establish plants large enough to afford the benefits of a cover since there is limited favorable weather for cover crop growth after maize harvest. The objective of this study was to quantify the impacts of the planting method and time of planting of three cover crop species when grown with or without maize competition on their establishment. Experiments were conducted in three environments during 2018 and 2019. Experiments consisted of a factorial combination of timing of cover crop planting (V7 and R4 growth stage of maize), cover crop species (camelina (Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz), rye (Secale cereale L.), or radish (Raphanus sativus L.), method of sowing (drilled or broadcast), and maize removal. Initial cover crop populations were similar regardless of maize removal or stage of maize when sown, but intersown cover crops produced only 3% of the fall biomass, compared with treatments with maize-removed when sown at the V7 stage of maize and 14% when sown at the R4 stage. Limited light intensity (less than 20%) under the maize canopy was the main factor affecting interseeded cover crop development. Radish was more sensitive to shading than the other cover crops. Camelina and rye sown at the R4 stage of corn produced similar spring biomass as earlier-sown cover crops. Intersown cover crops had no negative effect on maize grain yield. View Full-Text
Keywords: cover crops; camelina; rye; radish; intersowing; photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) cover crops; camelina; rye; radish; intersowing; photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schmitt, M.B.; Berti, M.; Samarappuli, D.; Ransom, J.K. Factors Affecting the Establishment and Growth of Cover Crops Intersown into Maize (Zea mays L.). Agronomy 2021, 11, 712. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11040712

AMA Style

Schmitt MB, Berti M, Samarappuli D, Ransom JK. Factors Affecting the Establishment and Growth of Cover Crops Intersown into Maize (Zea mays L.). Agronomy. 2021; 11(4):712. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11040712

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schmitt, Mattie B., Marisol Berti, Dulan Samarappuli, and Joel K. Ransom. 2021. "Factors Affecting the Establishment and Growth of Cover Crops Intersown into Maize (Zea mays L.)" Agronomy 11, no. 4: 712. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11040712

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