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Article

Infrared Thermography as an Operando Tool for the Analysis of Catalytic Processes: How to Use it?

by 1,† and 2,*,†
1
Urban Energy Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa), CH-8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
2
Thermo-Chemical Processes Group, Energy and Environment Division, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Forschungsstrasse 111, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Equally contributed to this work.
Academic Editors: Albin Pintar, Nataša Novak Tušar and Günther Rupprechter
Catalysts 2021, 11(3), 311; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11030311
Received: 31 January 2021 / Revised: 22 February 2021 / Accepted: 23 February 2021 / Published: 26 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Engineering Materials for Catalysis)
Infrared (IR) thermography is a powerful tool to measure temperature with high space and time resolution. A particularly interesting application of this technology is in the field of catalysis, where the method can provide new insights into dynamic surface reactions. This paper presents guidelines for the development of a reactor cell that can aid in the efficient exploitation of infrared thermography for the investigation of catalytic and other surface reactions. Firstly, the necessary properties of the catalytic reactor are described. Secondly, we analyze the requirements towards the catalytic system to be directly observable by IR thermography. This includes the need for a catalyst that provides a sufficiently high heat production (or absorption) rate. To achieve true operando investigation conditions, some dedicated equipment must be developed. Here, we provide the guidelines to assemble a chemical reactor with an IR transmitting window through which the reaction can be studied with the infrared camera along with other best practice tips to achieve results. Furthermore, we present selected examples of catalytic reactions that can be monitored by IR thermography, showing the potential of the technology in revealing transient and steady state chemical phenomena. View Full-Text
Keywords: IR thermography; operando methods; heterogeneous catalysis; exothermic reactions; transient phenomena IR thermography; operando methods; heterogeneous catalysis; exothermic reactions; transient phenomena
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mutschler, R.; Moioli, E. Infrared Thermography as an Operando Tool for the Analysis of Catalytic Processes: How to Use it? Catalysts 2021, 11, 311. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11030311

AMA Style

Mutschler R, Moioli E. Infrared Thermography as an Operando Tool for the Analysis of Catalytic Processes: How to Use it? Catalysts. 2021; 11(3):311. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11030311

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mutschler, Robin, and Emanuele Moioli. 2021. "Infrared Thermography as an Operando Tool for the Analysis of Catalytic Processes: How to Use it?" Catalysts 11, no. 3: 311. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11030311

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