Next Article in Journal
Global Trends of Latent Prostate Cancer in Autopsy Studies
Previous Article in Journal
Treatment of Advanced Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuro-Endocrine Tumors: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Phase III Randomized Controlled Trials
Article

Estimation of the Potentially Avoidable Excess Deaths Associated with Socioeconomic Inequalities in Cancer Survival in Germany

1
Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
2
Faculty 11-Human and Health Science, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen, Germany
3
Medical Faculty Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
4
Epidemiological Cancer Registry Baden-Württemberg, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
5
Cancer Registry of Rhineland-Palatinate gGmbH, 55116 Mainz, Germany
6
Saarland Cancer Registry, 66119 Saarbrücken, Germany
7
Landeskrebsregister Nordrhein-Westfalen gGmbH, 44801 Bochum, Germany
8
Epidemiological Cancer Registry Lower Saxony, 26121 Oldenburg, Germany
9
Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Institute of Health Economics and Health Care Management, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
10
Institute for Cancer Epidemiology at the University of Lübeck, Cancer Registry Schleswig-Holstein, 23538 Lübeck, Germany
11
Department of Economics, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Saale), Germany
12
Hamburg Cancer Registry, 20539 Hamburg, Germany
13
Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
14
German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Authors contributed equally to the manuscript
Members are listed in the Acknowledgements section.
Academic Editor: Anne-Marie Bouvier
Cancers 2021, 13(2), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13020357
Received: 24 November 2020 / Revised: 14 January 2021 / Accepted: 14 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention)
In this study, we estimate the number of avoidable deaths attributable to socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in Germany. We used data from epidemiological cancer registries. The German Index of Multiple Deprivation (GIMD) 2010 was used to assess deprivation on a municipality level. Results show that summed over the 25 cancer sites, 4100 annual excess deaths (3.0% of all excess deaths) could have been avoided each year in Germany during the period 2013–2016 if relative survival were in all regions comparable with the least deprived regions. Colorectal, oral and pharynx, prostate, and bladder cancer contributed the largest numbers of avoidable excess deaths. We also observed that cancer incidence was generally higher in more deprived areas. Our analyses demonstrate the importance of cancer prevention and of survival improvements in more deprived regions.
Many countries have reported survival inequalities due to regional socioeconomic deprivation. To quantify the potential gain from eliminating cancer survival disadvantages associated with area-based deprivation in Germany, we calculated the number of avoidable excess deaths. We used population-based cancer registry data from 11 of 16 German federal states. Patients aged ≥15 years diagnosed with an invasive malignant tumor between 2008 and 2017 were included. Area-based socioeconomic deprivation was assessed using the quintiles of the German Index of Multiple Deprivation (GIMD) 2010 on a municipality level nationwide. Five-year age-standardized relative survival for 25 most common cancer sites and for total cancer were calculated using period analysis. Incidence and number of avoidable excess deaths in Germany in 2013–2016 were estimated. Summed over the 25 cancer sites, 4100 annual excess deaths (3.0% of all excess deaths) could have been avoided each year in Germany during the period 2013–2016 if relative survival were in all regions comparable with the least deprived regions. Colorectal, oral and pharynx, prostate, and bladder cancer contributed the largest numbers of avoidable excess deaths. Our results provide a good basis to estimate the potential of intervention programs for reducing socioeconomic inequalities in cancer burden in Germany. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer; survival; avoidable deaths; socioeconomic deprivation; Germany cancer; survival; avoidable deaths; socioeconomic deprivation; Germany
MDPI and ACS Style

Jansen, L.; Kanbach, J.; Finke, I.; Arndt, V.; Emrich, K.; Holleczek, B.; Kajüter, H.; Kieschke, J.; Maier, W.; Pritzkuleit, R.; Sirri, E.; Schwettmann, L.; Erb, C.; Brenner, H.; Group, f.t.G.C.S.W. Estimation of the Potentially Avoidable Excess Deaths Associated with Socioeconomic Inequalities in Cancer Survival in Germany. Cancers 2021, 13, 357. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13020357

AMA Style

Jansen L, Kanbach J, Finke I, Arndt V, Emrich K, Holleczek B, Kajüter H, Kieschke J, Maier W, Pritzkuleit R, Sirri E, Schwettmann L, Erb C, Brenner H, Group ftGCSW. Estimation of the Potentially Avoidable Excess Deaths Associated with Socioeconomic Inequalities in Cancer Survival in Germany. Cancers. 2021; 13(2):357. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13020357

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jansen, Lina, Josephine Kanbach, Isabelle Finke, Volker Arndt, Katharina Emrich, Bernd Holleczek, Hiltraud Kajüter, Joachim Kieschke, Werner Maier, Ron Pritzkuleit, Eunice Sirri, Lars Schwettmann, Cynthia Erb, Hermann Brenner, and for t.G.C.S.W. Group 2021. "Estimation of the Potentially Avoidable Excess Deaths Associated with Socioeconomic Inequalities in Cancer Survival in Germany" Cancers 13, no. 2: 357. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13020357

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop