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Open AccessArticle

E-Cigarette Exposure Decreases Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

1
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
2
Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA 92617, USA
3
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92617, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2020, 12(8), 2292; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12082292
Received: 20 June 2020 / Revised: 9 August 2020 / Accepted: 9 August 2020 / Published: 14 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)
Electronic cigarettes (E-cigs) generate nicotine containing aerosols for inhalation and have emerged as a popular tobacco product among adolescents and young adults, yet little is known about their health effects due to their relatively recent introduction. Few studies have assessed the long-term effects of inhaling E-cigarette smoke or vapor. Here, we show that two months of E-cigarette exposure causes suppression of bone marrow hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Specifically, the common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte-macrophage progenitors were decreased in E-cig exposed animals compared to air exposed mice. Competitive reconstitution in bone marrow transplants was not affected by two months of E-cig exposure. When air and E-cig exposed mice were challenged with an inflammatory stimulus using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), competitive fitness between the two groups was not significantly different. However, mice transplanted with bone marrow from E-cigarette plus LPS exposed mice had elevated monocytes in their peripheral blood at five months post-transplant indicating a myeloid bias similar to responses of aged hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to an acute inflammatory challenge. We also investigated whether E-cigarette exposure enhances the selective advantage of hematopoietic cells with myeloid malignancy associated mutations. E-cigarette exposure for one month slightly increased JAK2V617F mutant cells in peripheral blood but did not have an impact on TET2−/− cells. Altogether, our findings reveal that chronic E-cigarette exposure for two months alters the bone marrow HSPC populations but does not affect HSC reconstitution in primary transplants. View Full-Text
Keywords: electronic cigarette; hematopoietic stem cell; myeloid progenitors; myeloproliferative neoplasm; lipopolysaccharide electronic cigarette; hematopoietic stem cell; myeloid progenitors; myeloproliferative neoplasm; lipopolysaccharide
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ramanathan, G.; Craver-Hoover, B.; Arechavala, R.J.; Herman, D.A.; Chen, J.H.; Lai, H.Y.; Renusch, S.R.; Kleinman, M.T.; Fleischman, A.G. E-Cigarette Exposure Decreases Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells. Cancers 2020, 12, 2292. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12082292

AMA Style

Ramanathan G, Craver-Hoover B, Arechavala RJ, Herman DA, Chen JH, Lai HY, Renusch SR, Kleinman MT, Fleischman AG. E-Cigarette Exposure Decreases Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells. Cancers. 2020; 12(8):2292. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12082292

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ramanathan, Gajalakshmi; Craver-Hoover, Brianna; Arechavala, Rebecca J.; Herman, David A.; Chen, Jane H.; Lai, Hew Y.; Renusch, Samantha R.; Kleinman, Michael T.; Fleischman, Angela G. 2020. "E-Cigarette Exposure Decreases Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells" Cancers 12, no. 8: 2292. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12082292

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