Next Article in Journal
Inhibition of Patched Drug Efflux Increases Vemurafenib Effectiveness against Resistant BrafV600E Melanoma
Next Article in Special Issue
EMT-Associated Heterogeneity in Circulating Tumor Cells: Sticky Friends on the Road to Metastasis
Previous Article in Journal
Flavonoids in Cancer Metastasis
Previous Article in Special Issue
Liquid Biopsy in Colorectal Carcinoma: Clinical Applications and Challenges
Review

Detection of Circulating Tumor Plasma Cells in Monoclonal Gammopathies: Methods, Pathogenic Role, and Clinical Implications

1
Translational and Clinical Research Program, Centro de Investigación del Cáncer and Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular del Cáncer, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC)- University of Salamanca, 37007 Salamanca, Spain
2
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Cáncer, CIBER-ONC number CB16/12/00400, Instituto Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain
3
Department of Hematology, University Hospital of Salamanca, IBSAL, IBMCC (USAL-CSIC), 37007 Salamanca, Spain
4
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Cáncer, CIBER-ONC number CB16/12/00233, Instituto Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2020, 12(6), 1499; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061499
Received: 1 May 2020 / Revised: 29 May 2020 / Accepted: 3 June 2020 / Published: 8 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circulating Tumor Cells' Heterogeneity and Precision Oncology)
Cancer dissemination and distant metastasis most frequently require the release of tumor cells into the blood circulation, both in solid tumors and most hematological malignancies, including plasma cell neoplasms. However, detection of blood circulating tumor cells in solid tumors and some hematological malignancies, such as the majority of mature/peripheral B-cell lymphomas and monoclonal gammopathies, has long been a challenge due to their very low frequency. In recent years, the availability of highly-sensitive and standardized methods for the detection of circulating tumor plasma cells (CTPC) in monoclonal gammopathies, e.g., next-generation flow cytometry (NGF), demonstrated the systematic presence of CTPC in blood in virtually every smoldering (SMM) and symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM) patient studied at diagnosis, and in the majority of patients with newly-diagnosed monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS). These methods set the basis for further detailed characterization of CTPC vs. their bone marrow counterpart in monoclonal gammopathies, to investigate their role in the biology of the disease, and to confirm their strong impact on patient outcome when measured both at diagnosis and after initiating therapy. Here, we review the currently available techniques for the detection of CTPC, and determine their biological features, physiopathological role and clinical significance in patients diagnosed with distinct diagnostic categories of plasma cell neoplasms. View Full-Text
Keywords: circulating tumor plasma cells; monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance; multiple myeloma circulating tumor plasma cells; monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance; multiple myeloma
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Sanoja-Flores, L.; Flores-Montero, J.; Pérez-Andrés, M.; Puig, N.; Orfao, A. Detection of Circulating Tumor Plasma Cells in Monoclonal Gammopathies: Methods, Pathogenic Role, and Clinical Implications. Cancers 2020, 12, 1499. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061499

AMA Style

Sanoja-Flores L, Flores-Montero J, Pérez-Andrés M, Puig N, Orfao A. Detection of Circulating Tumor Plasma Cells in Monoclonal Gammopathies: Methods, Pathogenic Role, and Clinical Implications. Cancers. 2020; 12(6):1499. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061499

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sanoja-Flores, Luzalba, Juan Flores-Montero, Martín Pérez-Andrés, Noemí Puig, and Alberto Orfao. 2020. "Detection of Circulating Tumor Plasma Cells in Monoclonal Gammopathies: Methods, Pathogenic Role, and Clinical Implications" Cancers 12, no. 6: 1499. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061499

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop