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Open AccessArticle

An In-Depth Exploration of Knowledge and Beliefs Associated with Soda and Diet Soda Consumption

1
School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
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Health Policy Centre, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
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School of Psychology, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
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Centre for Behavioural Research in Cancer, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
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School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
6
Food Policy, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, NSW 2042, Australia
7
College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA 5042, Australia
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Cancer Epidemiology and Population Health, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
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Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
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Centre for Nutrition and GI Diseases, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
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Obesity Policy Coalition and Alcohol and Obesity Policy, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2841; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092841
Received: 18 August 2020 / Revised: 4 September 2020 / Accepted: 15 September 2020 / Published: 17 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
The need to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is widely accepted, but whether artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) are a recommended alternative is a growing policy issue because of emerging evidence of potential health effects associated with excess consumption. This study aimed to establish the extent of the Australian population’s knowledge of the risks associated with consuming SSBs (e.g., soda) and ASBs (e.g., diet soda), which is essential for identifying which facets of knowledge to target with public health interventions. A national computer-assisted telephone survey of 3430 Australian adults was conducted in 2017. The survey included a range of measures to test associations between SSB and ASB knowledge and beliefs, demographic characteristics, and soda and diet soda consumption. Participants had an overall awareness that there were health risks associated with SSB and ASB consumption, but they lacked more detailed knowledge of health effects and nutritional composition of these drinks. These knowledge gaps are concerning given that SSBs and ASBs are consumed in large quantities in Australia. Public health interventions targeting consumers’ limited knowledge and perceptions of health risks associated with excess sugar, calorie intake and artificial sweeteners are essential in reducing the health burden of obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar-sweetened beverages; artificially sweetened beverages; population survey; knowledge; beliefs; consumption sugar-sweetened beverages; artificially sweetened beverages; population survey; knowledge; beliefs; consumption
MDPI and ACS Style

Miller, C.; Ettridge, K.; Wakefield, M.; Pettigrew, S.; Coveney, J.; Roder, D.; Durkin, S.; Wittert, G.; Martin, J.; Dono, J. An In-Depth Exploration of Knowledge and Beliefs Associated with Soda and Diet Soda Consumption. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2841.

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