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Remote Sens. 2017, 9(12), 1225; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs9121225

Remote Sensing in Human Health: A 10-Year Bibliometric Analysis

1
Department of Community Medicine, Information and Health Decision Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, 4200-450 Porto, Portugal
2
Centre for Health Technology and Services Research, 4200-450 Porto, Portugal
3
Department of Geosciences, Environment and Land Planning, Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
4
ICT—Institute of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 September 2017 / Revised: 20 November 2017 / Accepted: 23 November 2017 / Published: 28 November 2017
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Abstract

A mixed methods bibliometric analysis was performed to ascertain the characteristic of scientific literature published in a 10-year period (2007–2016) regarding the application of remote sensing data in human health. A search was performed on the Scopus database, followed by manual revision using synthesis studies’ techniques, requiring the authors to sort through more than 8000 medical concepts to create the query, and to manually select relevant papers from over 2000 documents. From the initial 2752 papers identified, 520 articles were selected for analysis, showing that the United States ranked first, with a total of 250 (48.1% of the total) documents, followed by France and the United Kingdom, with 67 (12.9% of the total) and 54 (10.4% of the total) documents, respectively. When considering authorship, the top three authors were Vounatsou P (22 articles), Utzinger J (19 articles), and Vignolles C (13 articles). Regarding disease-specific keywords, malaria, dengue, and schistosomiasis were the most frequent keywords, occurring 142, 34, and 24 times, respectively. For some infectious diseases and other highly pathogenic or emerging infectious diseases, remote sensing has become a very powerful instrument. Also, several studies relate different environmental factors retrieved by remote sensing data with other diseases, such as asthma exacerbations. Health-related remote sensing publications are increasing and this paper highlights the importance of these related technologies toward better information and, ideally, better provision of healthcare. On the other hand, this paper provides an overall picture of the state of the research regarding the application of remote sensing data in human health and identifies the most active stakeholders e.g., authors and institutions in the field, informing possible new collaboration research groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: bibliometric analysis; remote sensing; healthcare; medicine bibliometric analysis; remote sensing; healthcare; medicine
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Viana, J.; Santos, J.V.; Neiva, R.M.; Souza, J.; Duarte, L.; Teodoro, A.C.; Freitas, A. Remote Sensing in Human Health: A 10-Year Bibliometric Analysis. Remote Sens. 2017, 9, 1225.

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