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Article

Preliminary Assessment of Turbidity and Chlorophyll Impact on Bathymetry Derived from Sentinel-2A and Sentinel-3A Satellites in South Florida

1
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA
2
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Charleston, SC 29412, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(6), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11060645
Received: 19 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 March 2019 / Published: 16 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Satellite Derived Bathymetry)
Evaluation of the impact of turbidity on satellite-derived bathymetry (SDB) is a crucial step for selecting optimal scenes and for addressing the limitations of SDB. This study examines the relatively high-resolution MultiSpectral instrument (MSI) onboard Sentinel-2A (10–20–60 m) and the moderate-resolution Ocean and Land Color instrument (OLCI) onboard Sentinel-3A (300 m) for generating bathymetric maps through a conventional ratio transform model in environments with some turbidity in South Florida. Both sensors incorporate additional spectral bands in the red-edge near infrared (NIR) region, allowing turbidity detection in optically shallow waters. The ratio model only requires two calibration parameters for vertical referencing using available chart data, whereas independent lidar surveys are used for validation and error analysis. The MSI retrieves bathymetry at 10 m with errors of 0.58 m at depths ranging between 0–18 m (limit of lidar survey) in West Palm Beach and of 0.22 m at depths ranging between 0–5 m in Key West, in conditions with low turbidity. In addition, this research presents an assessment of the SDB depth limit caused by turbidity as determined with the reflectance of the red-edge bands at 709 nm (OLCI) and 704 nm (MSI) and a standard ocean color chlorophyll concentration. OLCI and MSI results are comparable, indicating the potential of the two optical missions as interchangeable sensors that can help determine the selection of the optimal scenes for SDB mapping. OLCI can provide temporal data to identify water quality characteristics and general SDB patterns. The relationship of turbidity with depth detection may help to enhance the operational use of SDB over environments with varying water transparency conditions, particularly in remote and inaccessible regions of the world. View Full-Text
Keywords: satellite-derived bathymetry; Sentinel optical missions; airborne lidar bathymetry; chart; turbidity; chlorophyll; false shoaling; atmospheric correction satellite-derived bathymetry; Sentinel optical missions; airborne lidar bathymetry; chart; turbidity; chlorophyll; false shoaling; atmospheric correction
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MDPI and ACS Style

Caballero, I.; Stumpf, R.P.; Meredith, A. Preliminary Assessment of Turbidity and Chlorophyll Impact on Bathymetry Derived from Sentinel-2A and Sentinel-3A Satellites in South Florida. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 645. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11060645

AMA Style

Caballero I, Stumpf RP, Meredith A. Preliminary Assessment of Turbidity and Chlorophyll Impact on Bathymetry Derived from Sentinel-2A and Sentinel-3A Satellites in South Florida. Remote Sensing. 2019; 11(6):645. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11060645

Chicago/Turabian Style

Caballero, Isabel, Richard P. Stumpf, and Andrew Meredith. 2019. "Preliminary Assessment of Turbidity and Chlorophyll Impact on Bathymetry Derived from Sentinel-2A and Sentinel-3A Satellites in South Florida" Remote Sensing 11, no. 6: 645. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11060645

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