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Open AccessArticle

Spatiotemporal Dynamics in Vegetation GPP over the Great Khingan Mountains Using GLASS Products from 1982 to 2015

by Ling Hu 1,2, Wenjie Fan 1,2,*, Huazhong Ren 1,2, Suhong Liu 3, Yaokui Cui 1,2 and Peng Zhao 1,2
1
Institute of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System, School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
2
Beijing Key Lab of Spatial Information Integration and 3S Application, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
3
Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(3), 488; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10030488
Received: 21 January 2018 / Revised: 2 March 2018 / Accepted: 19 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
Gross primary productivity (GPP) is an important parameter that represents the productivity of vegetation and responses to various ecological environments. The Greater Khingan Mountain (GKM) is one of the most important state-owned forest bases, and boreal forests, including the largest primeval cold-temperature bright coniferous forest in China, are widely distributed in the GKM. This study aimed to reveal spatiotemporal vegetation variations in the GKM on the basis of GPP products that were generated by the Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS) program from 1982 to 2015. First, we explored the spatiotemporal distribution of vegetation across the GKM. Then we analyzed the relationships between GPP variation and driving factors, including meteorological elements, growing season length (GSL), and Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR), to investigate the dominant factor for GPP dynamics. Results demonstrated that (1) the spatial distribution of accumulated GPP (AG) in spring, summer, autumn, and the growing season varied due to three main reasons: understory vegetation, altitude, and land cover; (2) interannual AG in summer, autumn, and the growing season significantly increased at the regional scale during the past 34 years under climate warming and drying; (3) interannual changes of accumulated GPP in the growing season (AGG) at the pixel scale displayed a rapid expansion in areas with a significant increasing trend (p < 0.05) during the period of 1982–2015 and this trend was caused by the natural forest protection project launched in 1998; and finally, (4) an analysis of driving factors showed that daily sunshine duration in summer was the most important factor for GPP in the GKM and this is different from previous studies, which reported that the GSL plays a crucial role in other areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: boreal forest; GPP; spatiotemporal distribution and variation; meteorological factors; phenological parameters boreal forest; GPP; spatiotemporal distribution and variation; meteorological factors; phenological parameters
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hu, L.; Fan, W.; Ren, H.; Liu, S.; Cui, Y.; Zhao, P. Spatiotemporal Dynamics in Vegetation GPP over the Great Khingan Mountains Using GLASS Products from 1982 to 2015. Remote Sens. 2018, 10, 488.

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