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Article

Civilian-Military Collaboration before and during COVID-19 Pandemic—A Systematic Review and a Pilot Survey among Practitioners

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Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden
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Department of Research and Development, Armed Forces Center for Defense Medicine, 426 76 Västra Frölunda, Sweden
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Center for Research and Education in Emergency Care, University of Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
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Regedim, VUB, Brussels and Department of Emergency Medicine, ZNA, Stuivenberg, 2060 Antwerp, Belgium
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Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Department of Security, Military University of Aviation, 08-521 Dęblin, Poland
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: John Rennie Short and Marc A. Rosen
Sustainability 2022, 14(2), 624; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14020624
Received: 12 November 2021 / Revised: 3 January 2022 / Accepted: 5 January 2022 / Published: 6 January 2022
Due to the similarity in skills and assets, Civilian-Military collaboration has emerged as one of the most reliable partnerships during the disaster and public health emergency management to address all necessary elements of surge capacity, i.e., staff, stuff, structure (space), and systems. This study aimed to evaluate this collaboration before and during the coronavirus 2019 pandemic. The outcomes of the systematic review revealed several published reports on successful civilian-military collaboration and proposed a need for further improvement. One hundred sixty-six individuals from 19 countries responded to nine questions, included in an online survey with the possibility to leave comments if necessary. The questionnaire referred to elements such as command and control, safety, communication, assessment, triage, treatment, and transport, as the crucial components of emergency management. The comprehensive examination of the survey results together with registered comments revealed a possible improvement in collaboration particularly on the strategic levels, i.e., meetings at the command-and-control level, safety, communication, and networking issues. While logistic collaboration seemed to be unchanged, the practical parts of the collaboration, i.e., clinical and non-clinical operational partnership (Triage and Treatment), mutual education, training, and operational understanding of each organization remained unchanged. In conclusion, although the current pandemic may have facilitated a more intense collaboration between civilian and military healthcare organizations, it lacks practical partnership and operative engagement, representing two crucial elements necessary for harmony and compatibility of both systems. Such collaboration may require a political will and perhaps a mutual civilian-military authority. View Full-Text
Keywords: civilian-military collaboration; interagency partnership; pandemic; public health civilian-military collaboration; interagency partnership; pandemic; public health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Khorram-Manesh, A.; Mortelmans, L.J.; Robinson, Y.; Burkle, F.M.; Goniewicz, K. Civilian-Military Collaboration before and during COVID-19 Pandemic—A Systematic Review and a Pilot Survey among Practitioners. Sustainability 2022, 14, 624. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14020624

AMA Style

Khorram-Manesh A, Mortelmans LJ, Robinson Y, Burkle FM, Goniewicz K. Civilian-Military Collaboration before and during COVID-19 Pandemic—A Systematic Review and a Pilot Survey among Practitioners. Sustainability. 2022; 14(2):624. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14020624

Chicago/Turabian Style

Khorram-Manesh, Amir, Luc J. Mortelmans, Yohan Robinson, Frederick M. Burkle, and Krzysztof Goniewicz. 2022. "Civilian-Military Collaboration before and during COVID-19 Pandemic—A Systematic Review and a Pilot Survey among Practitioners" Sustainability 14, no. 2: 624. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14020624

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