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Open AccessArticle

Techno-Environmental Analysis of the Use of Green Hydrogen for Cogeneration from the Gasification of Wood and Fuel Cell

1
National Institute of Electricity and Clean Energy, Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca Morelos 62490, Mexico
2
Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City 04510, Mexico
3
Institution of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China
4
CONACYT—Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, A.C., Calle 43 No. 130, Chuburná de Hidalgo, Mérida 97200, Mexico
5
Department of Engineering, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Deepak Pant
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3232; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063232
Received: 31 January 2021 / Revised: 11 March 2021 / Accepted: 12 March 2021 / Published: 15 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability of Carbon Capture and Utilisation)
This paper aims to evaluate the use of wood biomass in a gasifier integrated with a fuel cell system as a low carbon technology. Experimental information of the wood is provided by the literature. The syngas is purified by using pressure swing adsorption (PSA) in order to obtain H2 with 99.99% purity. Using 132 kg/h of wood, it is possible to generate 10.57 kg/h of H2 that is used in a tubular solid oxide fuel cell (TSOFC). Then, the TSOFC generates 197.92 kW. The heat generated in the fuel cell produces 60 kg/h of steam that is needed in the gasifier. The net efficiency of the integrated system considering only the electric power generated in the TSOFC is 27.2%, which is lower than a gas turbine with the same capacity where the efficiency is around 33.1%. It is concluded that there is great potential for cogeneration with low carbon emission by using wood biomass in rural areas of developing countries e.g., with a carbon intensity of 98.35 kgCO2/MWh when compared with those of natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) without and with CO2 capture i.e., 331 kgCO2/MWh and 40 kgCO2/MWh, respectively. This is an alternative technology for places where biomass is abundant and where it is difficult to get electricity from the grid due to limits in geographical location. View Full-Text
Keywords: biomass; hydrogen; fuel cell; gasification; pressure swing adsorption; carbon intensity biomass; hydrogen; fuel cell; gasification; pressure swing adsorption; carbon intensity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gonzalez-Diaz, A.; Sánchez Ladrón de Guevara, J.C.; Jiang, L.; Gonzalez-Diaz, M.O.; Díaz-Herrera, P.; Font-Palma, C. Techno-Environmental Analysis of the Use of Green Hydrogen for Cogeneration from the Gasification of Wood and Fuel Cell. Sustainability 2021, 13, 3232. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063232

AMA Style

Gonzalez-Diaz A, Sánchez Ladrón de Guevara JC, Jiang L, Gonzalez-Diaz MO, Díaz-Herrera P, Font-Palma C. Techno-Environmental Analysis of the Use of Green Hydrogen for Cogeneration from the Gasification of Wood and Fuel Cell. Sustainability. 2021; 13(6):3232. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063232

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gonzalez-Diaz, Abigail; Sánchez Ladrón de Guevara, Juan C.; Jiang, Long; Gonzalez-Diaz, Maria O.; Díaz-Herrera, Pablo; Font-Palma, Carolina. 2021. "Techno-Environmental Analysis of the Use of Green Hydrogen for Cogeneration from the Gasification of Wood and Fuel Cell" Sustainability 13, no. 6: 3232. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063232

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