Next Article in Journal
Eco-Economic Coordination Analysis of the Yellow River Basin in China: Insights from Major Function-Oriented Zoning
Next Article in Special Issue
On the Role of Perception: Understanding Stakeholders’ Collaboration in Natural Resources Management through the Evolutionary Theory of Innovation
Previous Article in Journal
Examining Soil Erosion Responses to Grassland Conversation Policy in Three-River Headwaters, China
Previous Article in Special Issue
What Hinders the Promotion of the Green Mining Mode in China? A Game-Theoretical Analysis of Local Government and Metal Mining Companies
Correction published on 21 May 2021, see Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 5806.
Article

Household-Level Determinants of Participation in Forest Support Programmes in the Miombo Landscapes, Zambia

1
Institute of International Forestry and Forest Economics, Thünen Institute, 21031 Hamburg-Bergedorf, Germany
2
Ecosystem Dynamics and Forest Management in Mountain Landscapes, Technical University of Munich, D-85354 Freising, Germany
3
Plant and Environmental Sciences Department, School of Natural Resources, Copperbelt University, Kitwe 10101, Zambia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Marc A. Rosen and Rui Manuel de Sousa Fragoso
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2713; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052713
Received: 6 January 2021 / Revised: 8 February 2021 / Accepted: 25 February 2021 / Published: 3 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Natural Resources)
The need to protect forest resources from unsustainable, yet rational, human actions has attracted global attention. This is because smallholder dependence on forests can degrade forest resources and cause deforestation. While efforts to understand forest programmes and motivations to protect forests have increased in recent decades, there remains a limited understanding of household factors affecting participation in forest support programmes, especially in the context of high-pressure areas, such as the Miombo woodlands. This study was conducted in the North-Western, Copperbelt and Eastern Province of Zambia. In each province, we selected landscapes consisting of protected and non-protected forest areas. We administered structured interviews to 1123 households and used logistic regression to estimate determinants of participation. We found that better education, landholding size, increased share of forest income, cash crops and non-farm income, and access to forests and markets have a negative impact on participation in forest support programmes. Being located in landscapes with protected areas was positively associated with participation. We suggest that, in order to increase participation, forest programmes should focus on households with low levels of education, limited livelihood opportunities, and poor access to markets. Besides, programmes should provide incentives, including support for farm inputs and at the same time encourage reforestation and agroforestry methods. View Full-Text
Keywords: miombo woodlands; participation; households; opportunity costs and benefits; logistic regression miombo woodlands; participation; households; opportunity costs and benefits; logistic regression
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kazungu, M.; Zhunusova, E.; Kabwe, G.; Günter, S. Household-Level Determinants of Participation in Forest Support Programmes in the Miombo Landscapes, Zambia. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2713. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052713

AMA Style

Kazungu M, Zhunusova E, Kabwe G, Günter S. Household-Level Determinants of Participation in Forest Support Programmes in the Miombo Landscapes, Zambia. Sustainability. 2021; 13(5):2713. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052713

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kazungu, Moses, Eliza Zhunusova, Gillian Kabwe, and Sven Günter. 2021. "Household-Level Determinants of Participation in Forest Support Programmes in the Miombo Landscapes, Zambia" Sustainability 13, no. 5: 2713. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052713

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop