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Article

Seeing the Wood for the Trees: Factors Limiting Woodland Management and Sustainable Local Wood Product Use in the South East of England

1
Centre for Environment and Sustainability, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK
2
Department of Geography and Environmental Science, The University of Reading, Whiteknights, P.O. Box 227, Reading RG6 6AB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 10071; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310071
Received: 4 November 2020 / Accepted: 20 November 2020 / Published: 2 December 2020
The South East of England has an abundance of woodland, which offers a potential sustainable timber and fuel resource in parallel with being a much-loved part of rural life and rich ecological wildlife habitat. An ever-increasing quantity of mature broadleaved trees is available for harvest forms, with appropriate management and a sustainable yield potential, set against the backdrop of only 10% of UK timber demand currently supplied from UK-grown resource. There has been little systematic research into the factors that limit the sector and initiatives to address the challenge have not had a significant impact on the amount of woodland under management. Through semi-structured interviews across the wood supply chain, this research provides an integrated analysis of the factors limiting woodland management in the South East of England. The findings indicate the sector is complex, multifaceted, slow to respond to change and driven by a strong set of human, economic, environmental, and structural motivations away from use of local wood product. A novel insight from the research was that although there was a positive affinity for forestry and a strong culture of woodland management across the spectrum of stakeholders, there was little evidence of effective collaboration or sector integration. These factors have been summarised in a ‘rich picture’ providing a visual and intuitive way of engaging with stakeholders. This research fills a significant gap in understanding the dynamics of forestry in the South East of England and provides new underpinning evidence for policy makers to design interventions aimed at delivering better sustainable utilisation of woodland resources in parallel with offering support to rural communities and economies. View Full-Text
Keywords: woodland management; forestry; wood products; sustainability; rich picture; policy woodland management; forestry; wood products; sustainability; rich picture; policy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Greenslade, C.; Murphy, R.; Morse, S.; Griffiths, G.H. Seeing the Wood for the Trees: Factors Limiting Woodland Management and Sustainable Local Wood Product Use in the South East of England. Sustainability 2020, 12, 10071. https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310071

AMA Style

Greenslade C, Murphy R, Morse S, Griffiths GH. Seeing the Wood for the Trees: Factors Limiting Woodland Management and Sustainable Local Wood Product Use in the South East of England. Sustainability. 2020; 12(23):10071. https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310071

Chicago/Turabian Style

Greenslade, Caroline, Richard Murphy, Stephen Morse, and Geoffrey H. Griffiths. 2020. "Seeing the Wood for the Trees: Factors Limiting Woodland Management and Sustainable Local Wood Product Use in the South East of England" Sustainability 12, no. 23: 10071. https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310071

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