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Article

Evaluation of Food Waste Prevention Measures—The Use of Fish Products in the Food Service Sector

Thünen Institute of Rural Studies, Bundesallee 64, 38116 Braunschweig, Germany
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Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6613; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166613
Received: 15 July 2020 / Revised: 10 August 2020 / Accepted: 11 August 2020 / Published: 15 August 2020
This study presents two food waste prevention measures focusing on the interface between the food service sector and its food suppliers. Through a case study on procuring salmon by a hotel kitchen, the use of food products with different convenience grades is examined. The convenience grade of the fish bought (whole salmon, fillets or portions) determines where along the food chain filleting and/or portioning takes place and thus where food waste from cut-offs occurs. To reduce food waste, we propose purchasing filleted or portioned salmon rather than whole salmon. For both measures, effectiveness is calculated by looking at food waste reductions along the food chain, achieved by a better use of filleting and portioning cut-offs. Next, sustainability across the environmental, economic and social dimension is evaluated by calculating (a) avoided embodied environmental impacts and economic costs, (b) avoided food waste disposal environmental impacts and economic costs and (c) environmental, economic and social impacts and costs associated with implementing the measures. Purchasing fillets or portions instead of whole salmon leads to food waste reductions of −89% and −94%, respectively. The interventions further lead to net climate change impact savings along the salmon chain of −16% (fillets) and −18% (portions). Whereas the kitchen saves costs when switching to fillets (−13%), a switch to portions generates additional net costs (+5%). On a social level, no effects could be determined based on the information available. However, good filleting skills would no longer be needed in the kitchen and a time consuming preparation can be sourced out. View Full-Text
Keywords: food waste; measure; sustainability evaluation; LCA; costs; fish processing; out-of-home; food service food waste; measure; sustainability evaluation; LCA; costs; fish processing; out-of-home; food service
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goossens, Y.; Schmidt, T.G.; Kuntscher, M. Evaluation of Food Waste Prevention Measures—The Use of Fish Products in the Food Service Sector. Sustainability 2020, 12, 6613. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166613

AMA Style

Goossens Y, Schmidt TG, Kuntscher M. Evaluation of Food Waste Prevention Measures—The Use of Fish Products in the Food Service Sector. Sustainability. 2020; 12(16):6613. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166613

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goossens, Yanne, Thomas G. Schmidt, and Manuela Kuntscher. 2020. "Evaluation of Food Waste Prevention Measures—The Use of Fish Products in the Food Service Sector" Sustainability 12, no. 16: 6613. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166613

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