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Article

Assessment of Outdoor Air Temperature with Different Shaded Area within an Urban University Campus in Hot-Humid Climate

1
Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur 54100, Malaysia
2
Faculty of Design and Architecture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Malaysia
3
Environmental Technology Division, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800, Malaysia
4
Razak Faculty of Technology and Informatics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Semarak, Kuala Lumpur 54100, Malaysia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(14), 5741; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12145741
Received: 16 May 2020 / Revised: 11 July 2020 / Accepted: 13 July 2020 / Published: 16 July 2020
This study investigated the variation of outdoor air temperature in the shaded area covered by buildings in an urban university campus in Malaysia. In-situ field measurements were conducted to measure the distribution of outdoor air temperature at eight different locations for seven days. Meanwhile, the building-induced shadows were generated using the AutoCAD Revit software to investigate the air temperature change. The study used four urban morphological parameters namely building to greenery ratio, sky view factor (SVF), and height-to-street width (H/W) ratio. The relationship between building-induced shadow and outdoor air temperature (Tout) obtained from the in-situ measurement was investigated. The results showed that the building-induced shadows could lower air temperature. It can be noted that a high ratio of building to greenery resulted in a higher air temperature. In contrast, the area with a low SVF value due to the combination of prolonged shading by buildings and trees had a lower air temperature. Thus, the area with a high building ratio, low greenery ratio, higher SVF value, and low H/W ratio potentially has a higher outdoor air temperature. Conclusively, combination of building shading created by appropriate ratio of building morphology and sufficient greenery able to improve the microclimate of a campus area. View Full-Text
Keywords: microclimate; building morphology; university campus; building-induced shadow; field measurement microclimate; building morphology; university campus; building-induced shadow; field measurement
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zaki, S.A.; Syahidah, S.W.; Shahidan, M.F.; Ahmad, M.I.; Yakub, F.; Hassan, M.Z.; Md Daud, M.Y. Assessment of Outdoor Air Temperature with Different Shaded Area within an Urban University Campus in Hot-Humid Climate. Sustainability 2020, 12, 5741. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12145741

AMA Style

Zaki SA, Syahidah SW, Shahidan MF, Ahmad MI, Yakub F, Hassan MZ, Md Daud MY. Assessment of Outdoor Air Temperature with Different Shaded Area within an Urban University Campus in Hot-Humid Climate. Sustainability. 2020; 12(14):5741. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12145741

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zaki, Sheikh A., Siti W. Syahidah, Mohd F. Shahidan, Mardiana I. Ahmad, Fitri Yakub, Mohamad Z. Hassan, and Mohd Y. Md Daud 2020. "Assessment of Outdoor Air Temperature with Different Shaded Area within an Urban University Campus in Hot-Humid Climate" Sustainability 12, no. 14: 5741. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12145741

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