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Open AccessArticle

Soil Microbiota of Dystric Cambisol in the High Tatra Mountains (Slovakia) after Windthrow

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Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovakia
2
Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 845 51 Bratislava, Slovakia
3
Faculty of Medicine, Slovak Medical University, 833 03 Bratislava, Slovakia
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Department of Landscape Ecology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovakia
5
Science Park, Comenius University in Bratislava, 841 04 Bratislava, Slovakia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6851; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236851
Received: 10 October 2019 / Revised: 20 November 2019 / Accepted: 22 November 2019 / Published: 2 December 2019
There has been much more damage to forests in the Slovak Republic in the second half of the 20th century than to other European countries. Forested mountain massifs have become a filter of industrial and transportation emissions from abroad, as well as from domestic origins. There are not only acidic deposits of sulphur and heavy metals present in forest soils, but other additional environmental problems, such as climate change, storms, fires, floods, droughts, are worsening the situation. Therefore, forest terrestrial ecosystems are becoming more vulnerable due to changes in natural and environmental conditions. In the High Tatra Mountains in Slovakia, which are protected as a national park, four internationally monitored localities were established after the windthrow disaster in 2004 and fire in 2005: REF, with intact forest; EXT, with extracted wood mass; NEX, with non-extracted wood mass; and FIR, the burnt locality. Soils from these localities were microbiologically analysed with special attention to fungi. Bacterial microbiota detected by high-throughput sequencing showed the prevalence of the genera Acidothermus, Mycobacterium, and Nocardia, and a very low presence of the genera Acidibacter, Burkholderia-Paraburkholderia, Optitus and the uncultured genus Desulfurellaceae H16 in the soil sample from the burnt locality when compared with the unburned sites. Additionally, soil mycocoenoses showed a low similarity between the locality with an intact forest ecosystem and the localities with extracted (REF–EXT) and non-extracted (REF–NEX) wood mass. There was no similarity with the burnt locality (FIR), where heat-resistant fungi dominated. It was shown that the windthrow disaster and subsequent extraction or non-extraction of wood mass did not affect the soil microbial communities or their development. On the other hand, the influence of fire was significant. View Full-Text
Keywords: high-throughput sequencing; soil microbial communities; dystric cambisol; windthrow; fire high-throughput sequencing; soil microbial communities; dystric cambisol; windthrow; fire
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Šimonovičová, A.; Kraková, L.; Piecková, E.; Planý, M.; Globanová, M.; Pauditšová, E.; Šoltys, K.; Budiš, J.; Szemes, T.; Gáfriková, J.; Pangallo, D. Soil Microbiota of Dystric Cambisol in the High Tatra Mountains (Slovakia) after Windthrow. Sustainability 2019, 11, 6851.

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