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Background:
Brief Report

An Experience with Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Evaluation, Management and Outcome

Department of General Surgery, Kempegowda Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangalore, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Clin. Pract. 2014, 4(2), 599; https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2014.599
Received: 29 April 2013 / Revised: 24 May 2014 / Accepted: 27 May 2014 / Published: 18 June 2014

Abstract

Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is a frequent emergency and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in spite of improved recognition, diagnosis and management. Trauma is the second largest cause of disease accounting for 16% of global burden. The World Health Organization estimates that, by 2020, trauma will be the first or second leading cause of years of productive life lost for the entire world population. This study endeavors to evaluate 71 cases of BAT with stress on early diagnosis and management, increase use of non operative management, and time of presentation of patients. A retrospective analysis of 71 patients of BAT who were admitted in Kempegowda Institute of Medical Sciences hospital (KIMS, Bangalore, India) within a span of 18 months was done. Demographic data, mechanism of trauma, management and outcomes were studied. Most of the patients in our study were in the age group of 21-30 years with an M:F ratio of 3.7:1. Motor vehicle accident (53%) was the most common mechanism of injury. Spleen (53%) was the commonest organ injured and the most common surgery performed was splenectomy (30%). Most common extra abdominal injury was rib fracture in 20%. Mortality rate was 4%. Wound sepsis (13%) was the commonest complication. Initial resuscitation measures, thorough clinical examination and correct diagnosis forms the most vital part of management. 70% of splenic, liver and renal injuries can be managed conservatively where as hollow organs need laparotomy in most of the cases. The time of presentation of patients has a lot to do with outcome. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment can save many lives.
Keywords: blunt abdominal trauma; trauma; spleen; computed tomographic scan; early diagnosis; resuscitation blunt abdominal trauma; trauma; spleen; computed tomographic scan; early diagnosis; resuscitation

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MDPI and ACS Style

Mehta, N.; Babu, S.; Venugopal, K. An Experience with Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Evaluation, Management and Outcome. Clin. Pract. 2014, 4, 599. https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2014.599

AMA Style

Mehta N, Babu S, Venugopal K. An Experience with Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Evaluation, Management and Outcome. Clinics and Practice. 2014; 4(2):599. https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2014.599

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mehta, Nikhil, Sudarshan Babu, and Kumar Venugopal. 2014. "An Experience with Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Evaluation, Management and Outcome" Clinics and Practice 4, no. 2: 599. https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2014.599

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