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Case Report

Dysphagia and Tongue Deviation: A Rare Case of Collett–Sicard Syndrome after Blunt Head Trauma

by 1,2 and 1,2,*
1
Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90502, USA
2
Los Angeles Biomedical Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Neurol. Int. 2020, 12(3), 136-139; https://doi.org/10.3390/neurolint12030019
Received: 28 October 2019 / Accepted: 14 November 2019 / Published: 21 December 2020
The jugular foramen and the hypoglossal canal are both apertures located at the base of the skull. Multiple lower cranial nerve palsies tend to occur with injuries to these structures. The pattern of injuries tend to correlate with the combination of nerves damaged. Case Report: A 28-year-old male was involved in an AVP injury while crossing the highway. Exam showed a GCS of 15 AAOx3, with dysphagia, tongue deviation to the right, uvula deviation to the left and a depressed palate. Initial imaging showed B/L frontal traumatic Sub-Arachnoid Hemorrhages (tSAH), Left Frontal Epidural Hematoma and a Basilar Skull Fracture. On second look by a trained Neuroradiologist c At 3 month follow up, patient’s tongue normalized to midline and his dysphagia resolved. Discussion: Collette-Sicard syndrome is a rare condition/syndrome characterized by unilateral palsy of CN: IX, X, XII. This condition has been rarely described as a consequence of blunt head trauma. In most cases, the condition is self-limiting with patients regaining most to all of their neurological functions within 6 months. Nerve traction injuries and soft tissue edema compressing the cranial nerves are the leading two hypothesis. In conclusion, injuries with focal neurological deficits which were not apparent on initial imaging should be reviewed by relevant experts with concomitant knowledge of the patient’s history. View Full-Text
Keywords: dysphagia; tongue deviation; subarachnoid hemorrhage dysphagia; tongue deviation; subarachnoid hemorrhage
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tamrazian, E.; Mehta, B. Dysphagia and Tongue Deviation: A Rare Case of Collett–Sicard Syndrome after Blunt Head Trauma. Neurol. Int. 2020, 12, 136-139. https://doi.org/10.3390/neurolint12030019

AMA Style

Tamrazian E, Mehta B. Dysphagia and Tongue Deviation: A Rare Case of Collett–Sicard Syndrome after Blunt Head Trauma. Neurology International. 2020; 12(3):136-139. https://doi.org/10.3390/neurolint12030019

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tamrazian, Eric, and Bijal Mehta. 2020. "Dysphagia and Tongue Deviation: A Rare Case of Collett–Sicard Syndrome after Blunt Head Trauma" Neurology International 12, no. 3: 136-139. https://doi.org/10.3390/neurolint12030019

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