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Historical Perspective, Development and Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing in Plant Virology

1
Consiglio per la ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Centro di Ricerca per la Patologia Vegetale, Via C. G. Bertero 22, Rome 00156, Italy
2
Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
3
Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Emeritus Lead Scientist.
Viruses 2014, 6(1), 106-136; https://doi.org/10.3390/v6010106
Received: 15 October 2013 / Revised: 17 December 2013 / Accepted: 24 December 2013 / Published: 6 January 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Viruses)
Next-generation high throughput sequencing technologies became available at the onset of the 21st century. They provide a highly efficient, rapid, and low cost DNA sequencing platform beyond the reach of the standard and traditional DNA sequencing technologies developed in the late 1970s. They are continually improved to become faster, more efficient and cheaper. They have been used in many fields of biology since 2004. In 2009, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies began to be applied to several areas of plant virology including virus/viroid genome sequencing, discovery and detection, ecology and epidemiology, replication and transcription. Identification and characterization of known and unknown viruses and/or viroids in infected plants are currently among the most successful applications of these technologies. It is expected that NGS will play very significant roles in many research and non-research areas of plant virology. View Full-Text
Keywords: next-generation (deep) sequencing; NGS; novel virus/viroid discovery; metagenomics; virome; transcriptome; DNA sequencing; RNA sequencing (RNA-seq.) next-generation (deep) sequencing; NGS; novel virus/viroid discovery; metagenomics; virome; transcriptome; DNA sequencing; RNA sequencing (RNA-seq.)
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Barba, M.; Czosnek, H.; Hadidi, A. Historical Perspective, Development and Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing in Plant Virology. Viruses 2014, 6, 106-136.

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