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Viruses and Bacteria Associated with Cancer: An Overview

1
Institute of Human Virology and Global Virus Network Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
2
Institute of Human Virology and Global Virus Network Center, Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alan Rein
Viruses 2021, 13(6), 1039; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13061039
Received: 3 May 2021 / Revised: 25 May 2021 / Accepted: 28 May 2021 / Published: 31 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Memory of Stephen Oroszlan)
There are several human viruses and bacteria currently known to be associated with cancer. A common theme indicates that these microorganisms have evolved mechanisms to hamper the pathways dedicated to maintaining the integrity of genetic information, preventing apoptosis of the damaged cells and causing unwanted cellular proliferation. This eventually reduces the ability of their hosts to repair the damage(s) and eventually results in cellular transformation, cancer progression and reduced response to therapy. Our data suggest that mycoplasmas, and perhaps certain other bacteria with closely related DnaKs, may also contribute to cellular transformation and hamper certain drugs that rely on functional p53 for their anti-cancer activity. Understanding the precise molecular mechanisms is important for cancer prevention and for the development of both new anti-cancer drugs and for improving the efficacy of existing therapies. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacteria; viruses; carcinogenesis; cancer progression; anti-cancer therapy; DnaK bacteria; viruses; carcinogenesis; cancer progression; anti-cancer therapy; DnaK
MDPI and ACS Style

Zella, D.; Gallo, R.C. Viruses and Bacteria Associated with Cancer: An Overview. Viruses 2021, 13, 1039. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13061039

AMA Style

Zella D, Gallo RC. Viruses and Bacteria Associated with Cancer: An Overview. Viruses. 2021; 13(6):1039. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13061039

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zella, Davide, and Robert C. Gallo. 2021. "Viruses and Bacteria Associated with Cancer: An Overview" Viruses 13, no. 6: 1039. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13061039

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