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Open AccessEditorial

Natural Disturbance Dynamics Analysis for Ecosystem-Based Management—FORDISMAN

1
Chair of Silviculture and Forest Ecology, Institute of Forestry and Rural Engineering, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 5, EE-51006 Tartu, Estonia
2
Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota, 115 Green Hall, 1530 Cleveland Avenue North, St Paul, MN 55108, USA
3
Chair of Forest Management Planning and Wood Processing Technologies, Institute of Forestry and Rural Engineering, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 5, EE-51006 Tartu, Estonia
4
InNovaSilva TpS, Højen Tang 80, 7100 Vejle, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(6), 663; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11060663
Received: 29 May 2020 / Accepted: 9 June 2020 / Published: 11 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Disturbance Dynamics Analysis for Forest Ecosystem Management)
Forest ecosystems are shaped by disturbances and functional features of vegetation recovery after disturbances. There is considerable variation in basic disturbance characteristics, magnitude, severity, and intensity. Disturbance legacies provide possible explanations for ecosystem resilience. The impact (length and strength) of the pool of ecosystem legacies and how they vary at different spatial and temporal scales is a most promising line of further research. Analyses of successional trajectories, ecosystem memory, and novel ecosystems are required to improve modelling in support of forests. There is growing evidence that managing ecosystem legacies can act as a driver in adaptive management to achieve goals in forestry. Managers can adapt to climate change and new conditions through anticipatory or transformational strategies of ecosystem management. The papers presented in this Special Issue covers a wide range of topics, including the impact of herbivores, wind, and anthropogenic factors, on ecosystem resilience. View Full-Text
Keywords: disturbance ecology; ecosystem legacy; resilience disturbance ecology; ecosystem legacy; resilience
MDPI and ACS Style

Jõgiste, K.; Frelich, L.E.; Vodde, F.; Kangur, A.; Metslaid, M.; Stanturf, J.A. Natural Disturbance Dynamics Analysis for Ecosystem-Based Management—FORDISMAN. Forests 2020, 11, 663.

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