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Article

Comparison of the Primary Stability of Porous Tantalum and Titanium Acetabular Revision Constructs

1
Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
3
National Joint Center, ATOS Clinics, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
4
Laboratory of Biomechanics and Implant Research, Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(7), 1783; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071783
Received: 29 February 2020 / Revised: 6 April 2020 / Accepted: 7 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
Adequate primary stability of the acetabular revision construct is necessary for long-term implant survival. The difference in primary stability between tantalum and titanium components is unclear. Six composite hemipelvises with an acetabular defect were implanted with a tantalum augment and cup, using cement fixation between cup and augment. Relative motion was measured at cup/bone, cup/augment and bone/augment interfaces at three load levels; the results were compared to the relative motion measured at the same interfaces of a titanium cup/augment construct of identical dimensions, also implanted into composite bone. The implants showed little relative motion at all load levels between the augment and cup. At the bone/augment and bone/cup interfaces the titanium implants showed less relative motion than tantalum at 30% load (p < 0.001), but more relative motion at 50% (p = n.s.) and 100% (p < 0001) load. The load did not have a significant effect at the augment/cup interface (p = 0.086); it did have a significant effect on relative motion of both implant materials at bone/cup and bone/augment interfaces (p < 0.001). All interfaces of both constructs displayed relative motion that should permit osseointegration. Tantalum, however, may provide a greater degree of primary stability at higher loads than titanium. The clinical implication is yet to be seen View Full-Text
Keywords: porous implants; tantalum; titanium; acetabulum; hip arthroplasty; hip replacement; revision hip arthroplasty; acetabular revision; primary stability porous implants; tantalum; titanium; acetabulum; hip arthroplasty; hip replacement; revision hip arthroplasty; acetabular revision; primary stability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Beckmann, N.A.; Bitsch, R.G.; Schonhoff, M.; Siebenrock, K.-A.; Schwarze, M.; Jaeger, S. Comparison of the Primary Stability of Porous Tantalum and Titanium Acetabular Revision Constructs. Materials 2020, 13, 1783. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071783

AMA Style

Beckmann NA, Bitsch RG, Schonhoff M, Siebenrock K-A, Schwarze M, Jaeger S. Comparison of the Primary Stability of Porous Tantalum and Titanium Acetabular Revision Constructs. Materials. 2020; 13(7):1783. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071783

Chicago/Turabian Style

Beckmann, Nicholas A., Rudi G. Bitsch, Mareike Schonhoff, Klaus-Arno Siebenrock, Martin Schwarze, and Sebastian Jaeger. 2020. "Comparison of the Primary Stability of Porous Tantalum and Titanium Acetabular Revision Constructs" Materials 13, no. 7: 1783. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071783

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