Next Article in Journal
Optimization of a 660 MWe Supercritical Power Plant Performance—A Case of Industry 4.0 in the Data-Driven Operational Management Part 1. Thermal Efficiency
Previous Article in Journal
The Financing of Renewable Energy Sources and the Level of Sustainable Development of Poland’s Provinces in the Area of Environmental Order
Previous Article in Special Issue
Demand-Response Application in Wastewater Treatment Plants Using Compressed Air Storage System: A Modelling Approach
Open AccessArticle

The Energy Trade-Offs of Transitioning to a Locally Sourced Water Supply Portfolio in the City of Los Angeles

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2020, 13(21), 5589; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215589
Received: 1 September 2020 / Revised: 30 September 2020 / Accepted: 9 October 2020 / Published: 26 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy-Water Nexus)
Predicting the energy needs of future water systems is important for coordinating long-term energy and water management plans, as both systems are interrelated. We use the case study of the Los Angeles City’s Department of Water and Power (LADWP), located in a densely populated, environmentally progressive, and water-poor region, to highlight the trade-offs and tensions that can occur in balancing priorities related to reliable water supply, energy demand for water and greenhouse gas emissions. The city is on its path to achieving higher fractions of local water supplies through the expansion of conservation, water recycling and stormwater capture to replace supply from imported water. We analyze scenarios to simulate a set of future local water supply adoption pathways under average and dry weather conditions, across business as usual and decarbonized grid scenarios. Our results demonstrate that an aggressive local water supply expansion could impact the geospatial distribution of electricity demand for water services, which could place a greater burden on LADWP’s electricity system over the next two decades, although the total energy consumed for the utility’s water supply might not be significantly changed. A decomposition analysis of the major factors driving electricity demand suggests that in most scenarios, a structural change in LADWP’s portfolio of water supply sources affects the electricity demanded for water more than increases in population or water conservation. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban water system; local water supply; water-energy nexus; electricity demand; index decomposition analysis urban water system; local water supply; water-energy nexus; electricity demand; index decomposition analysis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Zohrabian, A.; Sanders, K.T. The Energy Trade-Offs of Transitioning to a Locally Sourced Water Supply Portfolio in the City of Los Angeles. Energies 2020, 13, 5589. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215589

AMA Style

Zohrabian A, Sanders KT. The Energy Trade-Offs of Transitioning to a Locally Sourced Water Supply Portfolio in the City of Los Angeles. Energies. 2020; 13(21):5589. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215589

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zohrabian, Angineh; Sanders, Kelly T. 2020. "The Energy Trade-Offs of Transitioning to a Locally Sourced Water Supply Portfolio in the City of Los Angeles" Energies 13, no. 21: 5589. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215589

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop