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Energies 2017, 10(7), 1020; https://doi.org/10.3390/en10071020

Thermodynamic Analysis of Three Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems: Conventional, Adiabatic, and Hydrogen-Fueled

Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
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Received: 10 May 2017 / Revised: 15 June 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 18 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Energy Storage Technologies and Their Applications (AESA))
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Abstract

We present analyses of three families of compressed air energy storage (CAES) systems: conventional CAES, in which the heat released during air compression is not stored and natural gas is combusted to provide heat during discharge; adiabatic CAES, in which the compression heat is stored; and CAES in which the compression heat is used to assist water electrolysis for hydrogen storage. The latter two methods involve no fossil fuel combustion. We modeled both a low-temperature and a high-temperature electrolysis process for hydrogen production. Adiabatic CAES (A-CAES) with physical storage of heat is the most efficient option with an exergy efficiency of 69.5% for energy storage. The exergy efficiency of the conventional CAES system is estimated to be 54.3%. Both high-temperature and low-temperature electrolysis CAES systems result in similar exergy efficiencies (35.6% and 34.2%), partly due to low efficiency of the electrolyzer cell. CAES with high-temperature electrolysis has the highest energy storage density (7.9 kWh per m3 of air storage volume), followed by A-CAES (5.2 kWh/m3). Conventional CAES and CAES with low-temperature electrolysis have similar energy densities of 3.1 kWh/m3. View Full-Text
Keywords: compressed air energy storage (CAES); adiabatic CAES; high temperature electrolysis; hydrogen storage; thermodynamics compressed air energy storage (CAES); adiabatic CAES; high temperature electrolysis; hydrogen storage; thermodynamics
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Safaei, H.; Aziz, M.J. Thermodynamic Analysis of Three Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems: Conventional, Adiabatic, and Hydrogen-Fueled. Energies 2017, 10, 1020.

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