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Article

Real-World Treatment Patterns and Clinical Outcomes in Canadian Patients with AML Unfit for First-Line Intensive Chemotherapy

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Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada
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Hémato-Oncologue, Centre Intégré de Cancérologie de la Montérégie, Hôpital Charles LeMoyne, Greenfield Park, QC J4V 2G9, Canada
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McMaster University Medical Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7, Canada
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Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3A 1R9, Canada
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Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3T 1E2, Canada
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AbbVie Corporation, Saint-Laurent, QC H4S 1Z1, Canada
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St. Paul’s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6E 1M7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(10), 6794-6806; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29100535
Received: 9 August 2022 / Revised: 16 September 2022 / Accepted: 19 September 2022 / Published: 22 September 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Hematology)
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematological malignancy that predominantly affects the elderly. Prognosis declines with age. For those who cannot tolerate intensive chemotherapy, historically established treatment options have been hypomethylating agents (HMAs), low dose cytarabine (LDAC), and best supportive care (BSC). As the standard of care evolves for those unfit for intensive chemotherapy, there is a need to understand established treatment pathways, clinical outcomes and healthcare resource utilization in Canada. The CURRENT study was a retrospective chart review of AML patients not eligible for intensive chemotherapy who initiated first-line treatment between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2018. Data were collected from 170 Canadian patients treated at six hematology centers, of whom 118 received systemic therapy and 52 received BSC as first-line treatment. Median overall survival was 8.58 months and varied from 2.96 months for BSC to 13.31 months for HMAs. Over 80% of patients had at least one outpatient visit, and 67% of patients receiving systemic therapy and 71% of those receiving BSC had at least one admission to hospital, during their first line of therapy. A total of 96 (81.4%) patients receiving first line systemic therapy and 39 (75.0%) of those receiving first line BSC had at least one red blood cell or platelet transfusion. These findings highlight the unmet need for novel therapies for patients ineligible for intensive chemotherapy. View Full-Text
Keywords: acute myeloid leukemia; real-world evidence; treatment patterns; chemotherapy-ineligible; outcomes acute myeloid leukemia; real-world evidence; treatment patterns; chemotherapy-ineligible; outcomes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sanford, D.; Desjardins, P.; Leber, B.; Paulson, K.; Assouline, S.; Lembo, P.M.C.; Fournier, P.-A.; Leitch, H.A. Real-World Treatment Patterns and Clinical Outcomes in Canadian Patients with AML Unfit for First-Line Intensive Chemotherapy. Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29, 6794-6806. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29100535

AMA Style

Sanford D, Desjardins P, Leber B, Paulson K, Assouline S, Lembo PMC, Fournier P-A, Leitch HA. Real-World Treatment Patterns and Clinical Outcomes in Canadian Patients with AML Unfit for First-Line Intensive Chemotherapy. Current Oncology. 2022; 29(10):6794-6806. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29100535

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sanford, David, Pierre Desjardins, Brian Leber, Kristjan Paulson, Sarit Assouline, Paola M. C. Lembo, Pierre-André Fournier, and Heather A. Leitch. 2022. "Real-World Treatment Patterns and Clinical Outcomes in Canadian Patients with AML Unfit for First-Line Intensive Chemotherapy" Current Oncology 29, no. 10: 6794-6806. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29100535

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