Next Article in Journal
Knowledge about the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Visiting the Outpatient Clinics at Tertiary Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Adaptation of Questionnaire about Aggressive Beliefs and Attitudes in Spanish Adolescents
Previous Article in Journal
Introduction to the Special Issue “Emerging Trends in Combustible Tobacco and Vaping Product Use”
Previous Article in Special Issue
Do Crowding-Out Effects Explain the Low Effect of a Health Promotion Intervention among Young People at a Vocational School?
 
 
Article

Bullied Because of Their Teeth: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study on the Impact of Oral Health on Bullying Victimization among Australian Indigenous Children

1
Sydney School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Edward Ford Building, A27 Fisher Road, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2
Centre for Health Research, School of Business, The University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Darling Heights, Toowoomba, QLD 4350, Australia
3
Royal North Shore Hospital, Reserve Rd., St. Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia
4
Discipline of Exercise and Sports Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Level 6 Susan Wakil Health Building D18, Western Ave, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia
5
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
6
School of Management and Governance UNSW Business School, University of New South Wales, Kensington, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
7
Office of the Chief Scientist, The George Institute for Global Health, Level 5/1 King Street, Newtown, Sydney, NSW 2042, Australia
8
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, The University of Toronto, 155 College St. Room 500, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 4995; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19094995
Received: 22 February 2022 / Revised: 7 April 2022 / Accepted: 15 April 2022 / Published: 20 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behavioral Problems in Childhood and Adolescence)
Making life better for Indigenous peoples is a global priority. Although bullying and oral health have always been a topic of concern, there is limited information regarding the impact of this problem on the general population, with no evidence in this regard among the Australian Indigenous population. Thus, we aimed to quantify the relationship between bullying victimization and oral health problems by remoteness among 766 Australian Indigenous children aged between 10–15-years using data from the LSIC study. Bivariate and multilevel mixed-effect logistic regression analyses were employed. Findings indicated children self-reported bullying more than parents reported their children were being bullied (44% vs. 33.6%), with a higher percentage from rural/remote areas than urban areas. Parents reported that oral health problems increased the probability (OR 2.20, p < 0.05) of being bullied, in Indigenous children living in urban areas. Racial discrimination, lower level of parental education and poor child oral hygiene increase the risk of bullying victimization. Parental happiness with life and a safe community were associated with a lower risk of bullying. Dental problems are linked with Australian Indigenous children experiencing bullying victimization. Cultural resilience and eliminating discrimination may be two modifiable paths to ameliorating health issues associated with bullying in the Australian Indigenous community. View Full-Text
Keywords: bullying; oral health; indigenous; children; Australia bullying; oral health; indigenous; children; Australia
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Islam, M.I.; Chadwick, V.; Esgin, T.; Martiniuk, A. Bullied Because of Their Teeth: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study on the Impact of Oral Health on Bullying Victimization among Australian Indigenous Children. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 4995. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19094995

AMA Style

Islam MI, Chadwick V, Esgin T, Martiniuk A. Bullied Because of Their Teeth: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study on the Impact of Oral Health on Bullying Victimization among Australian Indigenous Children. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(9):4995. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19094995

Chicago/Turabian Style

Islam, Md Irteja, Verity Chadwick, Tuguy Esgin, and Alexandra Martiniuk. 2022. "Bullied Because of Their Teeth: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study on the Impact of Oral Health on Bullying Victimization among Australian Indigenous Children" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 9: 4995. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19094995

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop