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Ambient Air Pollution and Risk of Admission Due to Asthma in the Three Largest Urban Agglomerations in Poland: A Time-Stratified, Case-Crossover Study

1
Department of Allergology and Infectious Diseases, Military Institute of Medicine, 04-141 Warsaw, Poland
2
Polish Federation of Asthma Allergy and COPD Patients Associations, 01-604 Warsaw, Poland
3
Maria Skłodowska-Curie Medical School, 00-136 Warsaw, Poland
4
Faculty of Building Services, Hydro and Environmental Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-653 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou, Shyamali Dharmage, Gayan Bowatte and Dinh Bui
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5988; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105988
Received: 18 March 2022 / Revised: 4 May 2022 / Accepted: 11 May 2022 / Published: 14 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Risk Factors, Allergic Diseases and Lung Health)
Ambient air pollution in urban areas may trigger asthma exacerbations. We carried out a time-series analysis of the association between the concentrations of various air pollutants and the risk of hospital admission due to asthma over 7 days from exposure. We used distributed lag nonlinear models to analyze data gathered between 2010 and 2018 in the three largest urban agglomerations in Poland. Overall, there were 31,919 asthma hospitalizations. Over 7 days since exposure, the rate ratio (95%CI) for admission per 10 µg/m3 was 1.013 (1.002–1.024) for PM10; 1.014 (1.000–1.028) for PM2.5; 1.054 (1.031–1.078) for NO2; and 1.044 for SO2 (95%CI: 0.986–1.104). For all pollutants, the risk of admission was the greatest on the day of exposure (day 0), decreased below baseline on days 1 and 2, and then increased gradually up to day 6. The proportions (95%CI) of hospitalizations attributable to air pollution were 4.52% (0.80%–8.14%) for PM10; 3.74% (0.29%–7.11%) for PM2.5; 16.4% (10.0%–21.8%) for NO2; and 2.50% (−0.75%–5.36%) for SO2. In conclusion, PM2.5, PM10, NO2, and SO2 pollution was associated with an increased risk of hospital admission due to asthma in the three largest urban agglomerations in Poland over nine years. View Full-Text
Keywords: asthma; air pollution; PM10; PM2.5; nitrogen dioxide; sulfur dioxide; distributed lag nonlinear models asthma; air pollution; PM10; PM2.5; nitrogen dioxide; sulfur dioxide; distributed lag nonlinear models
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dąbrowiecki, P.; Chciałowski, A.; Dąbrowiecka, A.; Badyda, A. Ambient Air Pollution and Risk of Admission Due to Asthma in the Three Largest Urban Agglomerations in Poland: A Time-Stratified, Case-Crossover Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 5988. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105988

AMA Style

Dąbrowiecki P, Chciałowski A, Dąbrowiecka A, Badyda A. Ambient Air Pollution and Risk of Admission Due to Asthma in the Three Largest Urban Agglomerations in Poland: A Time-Stratified, Case-Crossover Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(10):5988. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105988

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dąbrowiecki, Piotr, Andrzej Chciałowski, Agata Dąbrowiecka, and Artur Badyda. 2022. "Ambient Air Pollution and Risk of Admission Due to Asthma in the Three Largest Urban Agglomerations in Poland: A Time-Stratified, Case-Crossover Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 10: 5988. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105988

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