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Article

Affective Fear of Crime and Its Association with Depressive Feelings and Life Satisfaction in Advanced Age: Cognitive Emotion Regulation as a Moderator?

School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, SE-701 82 Örebro, Sweden
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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4727; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094727
Received: 25 March 2021 / Revised: 24 April 2021 / Accepted: 26 April 2021 / Published: 29 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Mental Health)
Fear of crime is a substantial problem for older adults and is associated with reduced subjective well-being. However, less is known about factors that could moderate the associations between fear of crime and mental health problems and well-being in advanced age. Cognitive emotion regulation could serve as a potentially buffering factor for adverse health outcomes related to fear of crime due to its potential importance in managing feelings when facing threatening situations. The current study investigated the associations between affective fear of crime with depressive feelings and life satisfaction and examined whether adaptive and maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies moderated these associations in a sample of older adults (age 64–106) in Sweden (N = 622). The results showed that affective fear of crime was associated with more depressive feelings, less life satisfaction, and more frequent use of such maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies as rumination, catastrophizing, and blaming others. Moreover, rumination and self-blame moderated the associations between affective fear of crime and life satisfaction. Adaptive emotion regulation strategies were not associated with affective fear of crime and did not decrease the strength of its association with depressive feelings and with life satisfaction. These findings allow us to conclude that maladaptive emotion regulation could be considered a vulnerability factor in the association of fear of crime with life satisfaction. View Full-Text
Keywords: fear of crime; mental health; depressive feelings; emotion regulation; well-being; life satisfaction fear of crime; mental health; depressive feelings; emotion regulation; well-being; life satisfaction
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MDPI and ACS Style

Golovchanova, N.; Boersma, K.; Andershed, H.; Hellfeldt, K. Affective Fear of Crime and Its Association with Depressive Feelings and Life Satisfaction in Advanced Age: Cognitive Emotion Regulation as a Moderator? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4727. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094727

AMA Style

Golovchanova N, Boersma K, Andershed H, Hellfeldt K. Affective Fear of Crime and Its Association with Depressive Feelings and Life Satisfaction in Advanced Age: Cognitive Emotion Regulation as a Moderator? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4727. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094727

Chicago/Turabian Style

Golovchanova, Nadezhda, Katja Boersma, Henrik Andershed, and Karin Hellfeldt. 2021. "Affective Fear of Crime and Its Association with Depressive Feelings and Life Satisfaction in Advanced Age: Cognitive Emotion Regulation as a Moderator?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 9: 4727. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094727

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