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Article

Differentiating Endurance-and Speed-Adapted Types of Elite and World Class Milers According to Biomechanical, Pacing and Perceptual Responses during a Sprint Interval Session

1
Centre for Sport Studies, Rey Juan Carlos University, Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Madrid, Spain
2
Insititute of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Worcester, Worcester WR2 6AJ, UK
3
Department of Social Anthropology & Basic Psychology & Health, Pablo de Olavide University, 41704 Sevilla, Spain
4
Education Faculty, Autónoma University of Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2448; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052448
Received: 5 February 2021 / Revised: 25 February 2021 / Accepted: 27 February 2021 / Published: 2 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiological and Mechanical Performance Determinants in Running)
The aim was to compare pacing, biomechanical and perceptual responses between elite speed-and endurance-adapted milers during a sprint interval training session (SIT). Twenty elite and world-class middle-distance runners (male: n = 16, female: n = 4; 24.95 ± 5.18 years; 60.89 ± 7 kg) were classified as either speed- or endurance-adapted milers according to their recent performances at 800 m or longer races than 1500 m (10 subjects per group). Participants performed 10 repetitions of 100 m sprints with 2 min of active recovery between each, and performance, perceptual and biomechanical responses were collected. The difference between accumulated times of the last and the first five repetitions was higher in speed-adapted milers (ES = 1.07) displaying a more positive pacing strategy. A higher coefficient of variation (CV%) was displayed across the session by speed-adapted milers in average repetition time, contact time, and affective valence (ES ≥ 1.15). Speed-adapted milers experienced lower rates of valence after the 4th repetition excepting at the 8th repetition (ES ≥ 0.99). Speed-adapted milers may need to display a more positive pacing profile than endurance-adapted milers and, therefore, would experience lower levels of affective valence and a more rapid increase of ground contact time during a SIT. View Full-Text
Keywords: athletics; exercise performance; perceptions; coaching athletics; exercise performance; perceptions; coaching
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MDPI and ACS Style

Casado, A.; Renfree, A.; Jaenes-Sánchez, J.C.; Cuadrado-Peñafiel, V.; Jiménez-Reyes, P. Differentiating Endurance-and Speed-Adapted Types of Elite and World Class Milers According to Biomechanical, Pacing and Perceptual Responses during a Sprint Interval Session. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2448. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052448

AMA Style

Casado A, Renfree A, Jaenes-Sánchez JC, Cuadrado-Peñafiel V, Jiménez-Reyes P. Differentiating Endurance-and Speed-Adapted Types of Elite and World Class Milers According to Biomechanical, Pacing and Perceptual Responses during a Sprint Interval Session. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(5):2448. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052448

Chicago/Turabian Style

Casado, Arturo, Andrew Renfree, José C. Jaenes-Sánchez, Víctor Cuadrado-Peñafiel, and Pedro Jiménez-Reyes. 2021. "Differentiating Endurance-and Speed-Adapted Types of Elite and World Class Milers According to Biomechanical, Pacing and Perceptual Responses during a Sprint Interval Session" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 5: 2448. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052448

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