Next Article in Journal
A Successful Pilot Experiment of Salt Reduction in Tunisian Bread: 35% Gradual Decrease of Salt Content without Detection by Consumers
Next Article in Special Issue
Levels of Physical Activity and Mental Health in Adolescents in Ireland
Previous Article in Journal
COVID-19 on the Nile: Review on the Management and Outcomes of the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Arab Republic of Egypt from February to August 2020
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Association between Participation in Organized Physical Activity and the Structure of Weekly Physical Activity in Polish Adolescents
Article

Associations between Home Environment, Children’s and Parents’ Characteristics and Children’s TV Screen Time Behavior

1
School of Biological and Health Sciences, Technological University Dublin, City Campus, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland
2
School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou, Hanna Nałęcz, Talita Honorato-Rzeszewicz and Ida Laudańska-Krzemińska
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1589; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041589
Received: 11 November 2020 / Revised: 2 February 2021 / Accepted: 5 February 2021 / Published: 8 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour in Children and Youth)
In Ireland, television (TV) screen time is a highly prevalent sedentary behavior among children aged less than five years. Little is known about the influence of parental rules and policies or screen time availability and accessibility within the home on children’s TV screen time behaviors. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the extent to which parents’ sociodemographic and sedentary behaviors are associated with children’s TV screen time; and to determine the associations between parents’ rules and practices, home physical environment and children’s daily TV viewing. Three hundred and thirty-two children aged 3–5 years and their parents participated in the study. Children’s TV screen time and home environmental characteristics (parents’ rules and practices and the physical environment) were assessed using questions from standardized and validated questionnaires. The data were analyzed using binary logistic regression. Within the different sedentary behaviors evaluated, parents’ TV viewing was positively associated with children’s TV screen time (OR 1.65, 95%CI 1.09–2.50, p = 0.018). Leaving the TV on, whether or not it was being watched, was associated with a 38% increased probability of children watching ≥ 1 h TV daily. Children whose parents restricted their outdoor activity were more likely to watch ≥ 1 h TV daily (OR 2.01, 95%CI 1.04–3.88, p = 0.036). Findings from the study demonstrated that parents’ own screen time behaviors, leaving the TV on whether it was being watched or not and restricting outdoor play were associated with higher children’s TV viewing in the home environment. This knowledge is essential to inform future interventions aimed to address the increase in screen time among young children. View Full-Text
Keywords: pre-school children; screen time; home environment; parental role modeling pre-school children; screen time; home environment; parental role modeling
MDPI and ACS Style

Bassul, C.; Corish, C.A.; Kearney, J.M. Associations between Home Environment, Children’s and Parents’ Characteristics and Children’s TV Screen Time Behavior. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1589. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041589

AMA Style

Bassul C, Corish CA, Kearney JM. Associations between Home Environment, Children’s and Parents’ Characteristics and Children’s TV Screen Time Behavior. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1589. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041589

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bassul, Carolina, Clare A. Corish, and John M. Kearney. 2021. "Associations between Home Environment, Children’s and Parents’ Characteristics and Children’s TV Screen Time Behavior" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 4: 1589. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041589

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop