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Open AccessStudy Protocol

‘Tracking Together’—Simultaneous Use of Human and Dog Activity Trackers: Protocol for a Factorial, Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

1
Department of Applied Health Science, School of Public Health, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
2
Department of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
4
Data and Clinical Research, Kinship Division, Mars Petcare, Inc., 18101 SE 6th Way, Vancouver, WA 98683, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mary L. Greaney
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1561; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041561
Received: 29 December 2020 / Revised: 25 January 2021 / Accepted: 3 February 2021 / Published: 7 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthful Lifestyle Promotion and Obesity Prevention)
Dog-walkers are more likely to achieve moderate-intensity physical activity. Linking the use of activity trackers with dog-walking may be beneficial both in terms of improving the targeted behavior and increasing the likelihood of sustained use. This manuscript aims to describe the protocol of a pilot study which intends to examine the effects of simultaneous use of activity trackers by humans and their dogs on the physical activity level of humans and dogs. This study uses nonprobability sampling of dog owners of age 25–65 (N = 80) and involves four parallel groups in an observational randomized controlled trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design, based on use of dog or human activity trackers for eight weeks. Each group consists of dog-human duos, in which both, either or none are wearing an activity tracker for eight weeks. At baseline and end, all human subjects wear ActiGraph accelerometers that quantify physical activity for one week. Commercial activity trackers are used for tracking human and dog activity remotely. Additional measures for humans are body composition and self-reported physical activity. Dog owners also report dog’s weight and physical activity using a questionnaire. A factorial analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) is used to compare physical activity across the four groups from baseline to week-10. View Full-Text
Keywords: human activity trackers; canine activity trackers; dog walking human activity trackers; canine activity trackers; dog walking
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jayawardene, W.; Huber, L.; McDonnell, J.; Curran, L.; Larson, S.; Dickinson, S.; Chen, X.; Pena, E.; Carson, A.; Johnston, J. ‘Tracking Together’—Simultaneous Use of Human and Dog Activity Trackers: Protocol for a Factorial, Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1561. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041561

AMA Style

Jayawardene W, Huber L, McDonnell J, Curran L, Larson S, Dickinson S, Chen X, Pena E, Carson A, Johnston J. ‘Tracking Together’—Simultaneous Use of Human and Dog Activity Trackers: Protocol for a Factorial, Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1561. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041561

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jayawardene, Wasantha; Huber, Lesa; McDonnell, Jimmy; Curran, Laurel; Larson, Sarah; Dickinson, Stephanie; Chen, Xiwei; Pena, Erika; Carson, Aletha; Johnston, Jeanne. 2021. "‘Tracking Together’—Simultaneous Use of Human and Dog Activity Trackers: Protocol for a Factorial, Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 4: 1561. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041561

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