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Open AccessArticle

Predictive Factors of Self-Reported Quality of Life in Acquired Brain Injury: One-Year Follow-Up

1
Institute for Community Inclusion, Department of Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology, University of Salamanca, 37005 Salamanca, Spain
2
Institute for Community Inclusion, Department of Basic Psychology, Psychobiology and Behavioral Sciences Methodology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Salamanca, 37005 Salamanca, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 927; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030927
Received: 29 November 2020 / Revised: 19 January 2021 / Accepted: 19 January 2021 / Published: 21 January 2021
Background: The sequelae and disabilities that follow an acquired brain injury (ABI) may negatively affect quality of life (QoL). The main objective of the study is to describe the QoL after an ABI and identify the predictors of a better QoL. Methods: Prospective cohort study with follow-up measurement after one-year. The sample comprised 203 adults with ABIs (64% male) aged 18–86 years (M = 53.01, SD = 14.44). Stroke was the main etiology of the injury (55.7%), followed by a TBI (32.8%), and the average time since injury was 8 years (M = 8.25, SD = 7.83, range = 0.5–47.5). Patients assessed their QoL through the scale Calidad de Vida en Daño Cerebral (CAVIDACE self-reported version; “quality of life in brain injury” in English), an ABI-specific tool based on the eight-domain QoL model. Other variables measured were: depression, self-awareness, community integration, resilience, and social support at baseline and one-year follow-up. Results: The studied factors showed few significant changes over time. The analyses showed statistically significant differences in QoL scores in several sociodemographic (age, civil status, education, legal capacity, and dependency), injury-related (time, location, and comorbidity), rehabilitation, and personal-social variables (self-awareness, depression, social support, resilience, and community integration). The levels of dependency, depression, and satisfaction with social support were independent predictors of the total QoL score one-year follow-up. Conclusions: QoL after ABI depends on multiple elements that must be considered. There are factors such as satisfaction with social support, depression, community integration, and resilience that must be monitored throughout the rehabilitation process. View Full-Text
Keywords: acquired brain injury; CAVIDACE scale; longitudinal study; predictors; quality of life; self-reported outcomes acquired brain injury; CAVIDACE scale; longitudinal study; predictors; quality of life; self-reported outcomes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Aza, A.; Verdugo, M.Á.; Orgaz, M.B.; Amor, A.M.; Fernández, M. Predictive Factors of Self-Reported Quality of Life in Acquired Brain Injury: One-Year Follow-Up. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 927. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030927

AMA Style

Aza A, Verdugo MÁ, Orgaz MB, Amor AM, Fernández M. Predictive Factors of Self-Reported Quality of Life in Acquired Brain Injury: One-Year Follow-Up. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):927. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030927

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aza, Alba; Verdugo, Miguel Á.; Orgaz, María B.; Amor, Antonio M.; Fernández, María. 2021. "Predictive Factors of Self-Reported Quality of Life in Acquired Brain Injury: One-Year Follow-Up" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 3: 927. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030927

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