Next Article in Journal
Alzheimer’s Disease Caregiver Characteristics and Their Relationship with Anticipatory Grief
Next Article in Special Issue
Validating Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) in a Bangladeshi Population: Using Classical Test Theory and Rasch Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy among the Public in Kuwait: A Cross-Sectional Survey
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sleep Debt and Social Jetlag Associated with Sleepiness, Mood, and Work Performance among Workers in Japan
 
 
Article

Emotional Intelligence as a Mediator between Subjective Sleep Quality and Depression during the Confinement Due to COVID-19

1
Basic Psychology Area, Department of Clinical and Experimental Psychology, University of Huelva, 21007 Huelva, Spain
2
Social Psychology Area, Department of Psychology, University of Cádiz, 11519 Puerto Real, Spain
3
INDESS (Research Universitary Institute for Sustainable Social Development), University of Cádiz, 11406 Jerez de la Frontera, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Lucia Carboni and Fortunato Battaglia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8837; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168837
Received: 25 June 2021 / Revised: 6 August 2021 / Accepted: 17 August 2021 / Published: 22 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Quality and Health-Related Outcomes)
In March of 2020, as a consequence of the health crisis caused by the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus, the State of Alarm and home confinement of the entire population was imposed in Spain. It is foreseeable that this exceptional situation will have psychological effects on citizens. In this work, the impact of confinement on perceived sleep quality and depression is evaluated through questionnaires, as well as the mediating role of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in this relationship. Our results show, firstly, higher prevalence of depressive symptoms in women and young people associated with poorer perceived sleep quality, and secondly, that Emotional Intelligence intervenes as a mediator in this relationship through three different pathways. Worse perceived quality of sleep causes a greater number of depressive symptoms. In addition, this direct relationship may be enhanced by the mediating role of Emotional Intelligence, which we can express in three different ways: low perceived sleep quality and high emotional attention lead to greater depression; low perceived sleep quality and low emotional clarity increase greater symptoms of depression; and low perceived sleep quality together with low clarity and low emotional repair increase levels of depression. Therefore, we can conclude that improving the skills involved in Emotional Intelligence might increase perceived sleep quality, and thus reduce depressive symptoms, which in turn may improve the quality of life. View Full-Text
Keywords: emotional intelligence; perceived sleep quality; depression; confinement emotional intelligence; perceived sleep quality; depression; confinement
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Salguero-Alcañiz, M.P.; Merchán-Clavellino, A.; Alameda-Bailén, J.R. Emotional Intelligence as a Mediator between Subjective Sleep Quality and Depression during the Confinement Due to COVID-19. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8837. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168837

AMA Style

Salguero-Alcañiz MP, Merchán-Clavellino A, Alameda-Bailén JR. Emotional Intelligence as a Mediator between Subjective Sleep Quality and Depression during the Confinement Due to COVID-19. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8837. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168837

Chicago/Turabian Style

Salguero-Alcañiz, María Pilar, Ana Merchán-Clavellino, and Jose Ramón Alameda-Bailén. 2021. "Emotional Intelligence as a Mediator between Subjective Sleep Quality and Depression during the Confinement Due to COVID-19" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8837. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168837

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop