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Review

The Pandemic beyond the Pandemic: A Scoping Review on the Social Relationships between COVID-19 and Antimicrobial Resistance

1
Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Paasheuvelweg 25, 1105 BP Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Department of Anthropology, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 166, 1018 WB Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jianyong Wu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8766; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168766
Received: 30 June 2021 / Revised: 14 August 2021 / Accepted: 16 August 2021 / Published: 19 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Outbreak of a Novel Coronavirus: A Global Health Threat)
The social sciences are essential to include in the fight against both public health challenges of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and COVID-19. In this scoping review, we document what social science knowledge has been published about the social relationship between COVID-19 and AMR and which social science interventions are suggested to address this social relationship. We analysed 23 peer-reviewed articles published between 2019 and 2021. Results emphasize that changes in antibiotic prescription behaviour, misinformation, over-burdened health systems, financial hardship, environmental impact and gaps in governance might increase the improper access and use of antibiotics during the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing AMR. The identified social sciences transformation strategies include social engagement and sensitisation, misinformation control, health systems strengthening, improved infection prevention and control measures, environmental protection, and better antimicrobial stewardship and infectious diseases governance. The review emphasizes the importance of interdisciplinary research in addressing both AMR and COVID-19. View Full-Text
Keywords: antimicrobial resistance; COVID-19; social sciences; social dimensions antimicrobial resistance; COVID-19; social sciences; social dimensions
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MDPI and ACS Style

Toro-Alzate, L.; Hofstraat, K.; de Vries, D.H. The Pandemic beyond the Pandemic: A Scoping Review on the Social Relationships between COVID-19 and Antimicrobial Resistance. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8766. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168766

AMA Style

Toro-Alzate L, Hofstraat K, de Vries DH. The Pandemic beyond the Pandemic: A Scoping Review on the Social Relationships between COVID-19 and Antimicrobial Resistance. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8766. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168766

Chicago/Turabian Style

Toro-Alzate, Luisa, Karlijn Hofstraat, and Daniel H. de Vries. 2021. "The Pandemic beyond the Pandemic: A Scoping Review on the Social Relationships between COVID-19 and Antimicrobial Resistance" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8766. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168766

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