Next Article in Journal
The Patterns and Impact of Off-Working Hours, Weekends and Seasonal Admissions of Patients with Major Trauma in a Level 1 Trauma Center
Next Article in Special Issue
Social and Biological Transgenerational Underpinnings of Adolescent Pregnancy
Previous Article in Journal
Comparison of the Effect of Amaranth Oil vs. Rapeseed Oil on Selected Atherosclerosis Markers in Overweight and Obese Subjects: A Randomized Double-Blind Cross-Over Trial
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effect of Natural Disaster-Related Prenatal Maternal Stress on Child Development and Health: A Meta-Analytic Review
 
 
Study Protocol

Pregnant Women’s Experiences during Hurricane Maria: Impact, Personal Meaning, and Health Care Needs

1
Department of Sociobehavioral and Administrative Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University, San Juan, PR 00926, USA
2
Department of Sociobehavioral and Administrative Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, FL 33328, USA
3
School of Public Health, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00936, USA
4
School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00936, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Cathy Vaillancourt, Kelsey Needham Dancause and Suzanne King
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8541; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168541
Received: 1 July 2021 / Revised: 6 August 2021 / Accepted: 9 August 2021 / Published: 12 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prenatal Stress, Health Behaviors and Child Development)
During a disaster, pregnant women are considered among the most vulnerable. Background: On 20 September 2017, the Caribbean was hit by a category 4 hurricane. The purpose of the study was to explore the impact on pregnant women during and after the hurricane regarding access to health care, social services, and support systems. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted to 10 women that were pregnant during the event. Qualitative inquiry based on the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis framework was used to interpret the narratives. Results: Five major themes emerged: meaning of living through a disaster, fear, the dual burden of protecting themselves and their unborn baby, disruption in health care, and coping mechanisms. Despite the negative feelings, most participants experienced positive transformations. They narrated how they stayed calm and coped in order to protect their pregnancy. Their overall evaluation of the healthcare system was positive. The support of friends and family was crucial pre and post-disaster. Conclusions: The interviews provided a wealth of firsthand information of women experiencing a natural disaster while pregnant. The findings underscore the need to incorporate emotional support in the preparedness and response plans for pregnant women. Educating, empowering, and incorporating families and communities is vital in these efforts. View Full-Text
Keywords: hurricane; natural disasters; pregnant women; prenatal stress; pregnancy hurricane; natural disasters; pregnant women; prenatal stress; pregnancy
MDPI and ACS Style

Silva-Suarez, G.; Rabionet, S.E.; Zorrilla, C.D.; Perez-Menendez, H.; Rivera-Leon, S. Pregnant Women’s Experiences during Hurricane Maria: Impact, Personal Meaning, and Health Care Needs. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8541. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168541

AMA Style

Silva-Suarez G, Rabionet SE, Zorrilla CD, Perez-Menendez H, Rivera-Leon S. Pregnant Women’s Experiences during Hurricane Maria: Impact, Personal Meaning, and Health Care Needs. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8541. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168541

Chicago/Turabian Style

Silva-Suarez, Georgina, Silvia E. Rabionet, Carmen D. Zorrilla, Hulda Perez-Menendez, and Solaritza Rivera-Leon. 2021. "Pregnant Women’s Experiences during Hurricane Maria: Impact, Personal Meaning, and Health Care Needs" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8541. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168541

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop