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Open AccessArticle

Epidemiology of Paediatric Shoulder Dislocation: A Nationwide Study in Italy from 2001 to 2014

1
Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Campus Bio-Medico University, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 200, 00128 Rome, Italy
2
Department of Orthopedics, Children’s Hospital Bambino Gesù, Via Torre di Palidoro, Palidoro, 00165 Rome, Italy
3
Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2834; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082834
Received: 10 March 2020 / Revised: 15 April 2020 / Accepted: 17 April 2020 / Published: 20 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Burden of Orthopedic Surgery)
Limited knowledge is accessible concerning the tendencies of hospitalization for skeletally immature patients with episodes of shoulder dislocation. Our research aim was to evaluate annual hospitalizations for shoulder dislocation in paediatric patients in Italy from 2001 to 2014, on the basis of the official data source as hospitalization reports. The second purpose was to investigate geographical diversification in hospitalization for shoulder dislocation in regions of Italy. The last aim was to make statistical predictions of the number of shoulder dislocation hospitalization volumes and rates in skeletally immature patients based on data from 2001 to 2014. An examination of the National Hospital Discharge records (SDO) kept at the Italian Ministry of Health regarding the 14 years of our study (2001 through 2014) was conducted. These data are anonymous and include patient’s age, gender, domicile, region and time of hospitalization, and the kind of reimbursement (public or private). In the 14-year study time, 344 hospitalizations for shoulder dislocation of patients aged 0–14 years took place in Italy. The male/female hospitalization ratio varied from a maximum of 3.0 (2001) to a minimum of 1.1 (2013), with a mean average ratio in the 2001–2014 timespan of 2.0. Almost half of the hospitalizations (49.1%) were performed in the South. The mean incidence of hospitalizations in Italy for shoulder dislocation in patients with less than 14 years was 0.3 for every 100,000 inhabitants in the same class of age. The most common treatment was a closed reduction (60.8%), followed by open stabilization (16.6%) and arthroscopic procedures (13.7%). The present registry study shows a low incidence of hospitalization for shoulder dislocation in young patients. The most common treatment for a shoulder dislocation in paediatric patients is a closed shoulder reduction. Regions from the south and the centre of Italy are marked by an inferior number of operations and a higher number of hospitalization for closed shoulder reduction. View Full-Text
Keywords: epidemiology; shoulder; dislocation; surgery; reduction; instability; young; child; children epidemiology; shoulder; dislocation; surgery; reduction; instability; young; child; children
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Longo, U.G.; Salvatore, G.; Locher, J.; Ruzzini, L.; Candela, V.; Berton, A.; Stelitano, G.; Schena, E.; Denaro, V. Epidemiology of Paediatric Shoulder Dislocation: A Nationwide Study in Italy from 2001 to 2014. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2834.

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