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Open AccessArticle

Short-Term Impact of Traffic-Related Particulate Matter and Noise Exposure on Cardiac Function

Centre Urbanisation Culture Société, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Montréal, QC H2X 1E3, Canada
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1220; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041220
Received: 28 January 2020 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 10 February 2020 / Published: 13 February 2020
Exposure to traffic-related air pollution and noise exposure contributes to detrimental effects on cardiac function, but the underlying short-term effects related to their simultaneous personal exposure remain uncertain. The aim is to assess the impact of total inhaled dose of particulate matter and total noise exposure on the variations of electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters between pre-cycling and post-cycling periods. Mid-June 2019, we collected four participants’ personal exposure data related to traffic-related noise and particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) as well as ECG parameters. Several Bayesian linear models were built to examine a potential association between air pollutants and noise exposure and ECG parameters: heart rate (HR), standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), percentage of successive RR intervals that differ by more than 50 ms (pNN50), root mean square of successive RR interval differences (rMSSD), low-frequency power (LF), high-frequency power (HF), and ratio of low- to high-frequency power (LF/HF). We analyzed in total 255 5-min segments of RR intervals. We observed that per 1 µg increase in cumulative inhaled dose of PM2.5 was associated with 0.48 (95% CI: 0.22; 15.61) increase in variation of the heart rate, while one percent of total noise dose was associated with 0.49 (95% CI: 0.17; 0.83) increase in variation of heart rate between corresponding periods. Personal noise exposure was no longer significant once the PM2.5 was introduced in the whole model, whilst coefficients of the latter that were significant previously remained unchanged. Short-term exposure to traffic-related air and noise pollution did not, however, have an impact on heart rate variability. View Full-Text
Keywords: cycling; heart rate variability; air pollution; environment noise; PM2.5; traffic-related air pollution; traffic noise cycling; heart rate variability; air pollution; environment noise; PM2.5; traffic-related air pollution; traffic noise
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MDPI and ACS Style

Buregeya, J.M.; Apparicio, P.; Gelb, J. Short-Term Impact of Traffic-Related Particulate Matter and Noise Exposure on Cardiac Function. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1220.

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