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The Prevalence and Characterization of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase- and Carbapenemase-Producing Bacteria from Hospital Sewage, Treated Effluents and Receiving Rivers

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Department of Pathogenic Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000, China
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Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1183; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041183
Received: 13 January 2020 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 10 February 2020 / Published: 13 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Microbiology)
Hospital sewage plays a key role in the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant genes (ARGs) by serving as an environmental antimicrobial resistance reservoir. In this study, we aimed to characterize the cephalosporin- and carbapenem-resistant isolates from hospital sewage and receiving rivers. The results showed that ESBL (blaCTX-M) and carbapenemase genes (blaNDM and blaKPC) were widely detected in a number of different bacterial species. These resistance genes were mainly harbored in Enterobacteriaceae, followed by Acinetobacter and Aeromonas isolates. More attention should be given to these bacteria as important vectors of ARGs in the environment. Furthermore, we showed that the multidrug resistance phenotype was highly prevalent, which was found in 85.5% Enterobacteriaceae and 75% Acinetobacter strains. Notably, the presence of carbapenemase genes in isolates from treated effluents and receiving rivers indicates that the discharges of wastewater treatment plants could be an important source for high-risk resistance genes propagation to the environment. In conclusion, this study shows a high prevalence of ESBL- and carbapenemase-producing bacteria in hospital sewage and receiving rivers in China. These findings have serious implications for human health, and also suggest the need for more efforts to control the dissemination of resistant bacteria from hospital sewage into the environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbapenemase; blaNDM; blaKPC; hospital sewage; Enterobacteriaceae carbapenemase; blaNDM; blaKPC; hospital sewage; Enterobacteriaceae
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Zhang, L.; Ma, X.; Luo, L.; Hu, N.; Duan, J.; Tang, Z.; Zhong, R.; Li, Y. The Prevalence and Characterization of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase- and Carbapenemase-Producing Bacteria from Hospital Sewage, Treated Effluents and Receiving Rivers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1183.

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