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A Larger Ecology of Family Sexuality Communication: Extended Family Perspectives on Relationships, Sexual Orientation, and Positive Aspects of Sex

Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA 02481, USA
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 1057; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031057
Received: 15 January 2020 / Revised: 4 February 2020 / Accepted: 6 February 2020 / Published: 7 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
Extended family can be a resource for conversations about sex, but extended family perspectives have been largely left out of existing research. The present study investigates how extended family, such as aunts and uncles, siblings and cousins, perceive communication with teens in their families about sex. A thematic analysis was conducted with data from interviews in the U.S. with 39 extended family members, primarily siblings, who reported talk with teens in their families about sex. The analyses identified one theme focused on perspectives surrounding what is most important for teens to know about sex and relationships and seven themes focused on the content of conversations with teens about sex. The most prevalent content areas were: Healthy and Unhealthy Relationships (87%), Sexual Orientation (82%), Sexual Behavior (82%), and Protection (74%). The findings highlight extended family members’ unique roles in supporting the sexual health of teens in their families, which include providing information and support about issues other family members may not address, such as sexual orientation and the positive aspects of sex. The findings suggest the need to include extended family in sex education interventions to reflect the broader ecology of teens’ family relationships and access an underutilized resource for teens’ sexual health. View Full-Text
Keywords: teenage reproductive health; extended family; family sexuality communication; adolescent health teenage reproductive health; extended family; family sexuality communication; adolescent health
MDPI and ACS Style

Grossman, J.M.; Nagar, A.; Charmaraman, L.; Richer, A.M. A Larger Ecology of Family Sexuality Communication: Extended Family Perspectives on Relationships, Sexual Orientation, and Positive Aspects of Sex. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1057. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031057

AMA Style

Grossman JM, Nagar A, Charmaraman L, Richer AM. A Larger Ecology of Family Sexuality Communication: Extended Family Perspectives on Relationships, Sexual Orientation, and Positive Aspects of Sex. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(3):1057. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031057

Chicago/Turabian Style

Grossman, Jennifer M.; Nagar, Anmol; Charmaraman, Linda; Richer, Amanda M. 2020. "A Larger Ecology of Family Sexuality Communication: Extended Family Perspectives on Relationships, Sexual Orientation, and Positive Aspects of Sex" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 3: 1057. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031057

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