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Open AccessArticle

Active Commuting and Depression Symptoms in Adults: A Systematic Review

1
CIPER, Faculdade de Motricidade Humana, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada da Costa, 1499-002 Cruz Quebrada, Portugal
2
ISAMB, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-028 Lisboa, Portugal
3
Escuela de Doctorado, University of Huelva, 21071 Huelva, Spain
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Champalimaud Clinical Center, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Champalimaud Foundation, 1400-038 Lisbon, Portugal
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Departamento de Educação Física e Desporto, Universidade da Madeira, 9020-105 Funchal, Portugal
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Interactive Technologies Institute, LARSyS, 9020-105 Funchal, Portugal
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Department of Social, Developmental and Educational Psychology, University of Huelva, 21007 Huelva, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 1041; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031041
Received: 8 January 2020 / Revised: 4 February 2020 / Accepted: 5 February 2020 / Published: 6 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Physical activity (PA) is suggested to have a protective effect against depression. One way of engaging in PA is through active commuting. This review summarises the literature regarding the relationship between active commuting and depression among adults and older adults. A systematic review of studies published up to December 2019, performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines, was conducted using three databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science). A total of seven articles were identified as relevant. The results from these studies were inconsistent. Only two presented a significant relationship between active commuting and depression symptoms. In those two studies, switching to more active modes of travel and walking long distances were negatively related to the likelihood of developing new depressive symptoms. In the other five studies, no significant association between active travel or active commuting and depression was found. The relationship between active commuting and depression symptoms in adults is not clear. More studies on this topic are necessary in order to understand if active commuting can be used as a public health strategy to tackle mental health issues such as depression. View Full-Text
Keywords: active travel; walking; cycling; mental health active travel; walking; cycling; mental health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Marques, A.; Peralta, M.; Henriques-Neto, D.; Frasquilho, D.; Rubio Gouveira, É.; Gomez-Baya, D. Active Commuting and Depression Symptoms in Adults: A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1041.

AMA Style

Marques A, Peralta M, Henriques-Neto D, Frasquilho D, Rubio Gouveira É, Gomez-Baya D. Active Commuting and Depression Symptoms in Adults: A Systematic Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(3):1041.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marques, Adilson; Peralta, Miguel; Henriques-Neto, Duarte; Frasquilho, Diana; Rubio Gouveira, Élvio; Gomez-Baya, Diego. 2020. "Active Commuting and Depression Symptoms in Adults: A Systematic Review" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 3: 1041.

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